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Wednesday, January 19
 

12:00pm

ALL SESSIONS SUBJECT TO CHANGE
Wednesday January 19, 2011 12:00pm - Friday January 21, 2011 1:00pm
~ Ballroom A Main Floor - Renaissance Arboretum, Austin, Texas

6:00pm

TAME Trailer

The TAME Trailblazer has been fitted with a variety of engineering and science exhibits and travels across the state. Alliance volunteers and/or the TAME central office arrange for the sponsored Trailblazer events which take place at schools or as part of a community or corporate event. Where possible, parents are invited to tour as well. Volunteers are stationed throughout the trailers to provide oral explanations and demonstrations of the exhibits. The Trailblazer continues to be an important outreach program and is made possible by generous support from Boeing, ConocoPhillips, Dow, Halliburton, Houston Museum of Natural Science, Marathon Oil Company, Shell Oil Company, United Space Alliance.


Speaker/Facilitator

Wednesday January 19, 2011 6:00pm - 7:30pm
~ Parking Lot

6:30pm

Welcome Reception

Join us for light snacks and cash bar as we peruse the array of student research poster presentations.


Wednesday January 19, 2011 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Glass Oaks Main Floor - Side Wing

6:30pm

Biodegradable Multifunctional Nanoparticles

Biodegradable Multifunctional Nanoparticles An effective drug delivery System The implementation of nanomaterials has been proven useful in fields spanning from molecular imaging, and molecular diagnosis, to targeted therapy in biomedical research. This variety may be accredited to the natural advantages given to these drugs in their composition. These nanomaterials have improved circulation times, enabled precise targeting, enhanced dissolution rates, and allow for enhance contrast when used as imaging agents- all from a change in partial size and encapsulation technique. Current methods of nanoparticle formation follow an extensive process of naturally occurring amalgamations between hydrophilic and hydrophobic components, leaving many aspects of particle formation unpredictable. This experiment explores a new approach to the formation of multifunctional Nanoparticles with the implementation of the Flash Nano-Precipitation (FNP) method; which, in a direct infusion between a hydrophobic drug-polymer mixture and water, creates the desired Nanoparticles nearly simultaneously upon infusion. Furthermore, this study tests the stability of these particles, and aims to display the ability of this method to precisely engineer aspects of these particles. In this heightened control of such nanoparticles, greater material efficiency is allotted. Moreover, the biodegradable properties of the polymers, and the methods of direct targeting available due to the nanoscale, allows for a lessened dosage of drugs that are harmful to the body (i.e. many drugs used in the treatment of cancer,) enabling a lessened use of chemicals both harmful to the body and the environment.


Speaker/Facilitator

Wednesday January 19, 2011 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Glass Oaks Main Floor - Side Wing

6:30pm

Biofuel

Biofuel known as an alternative fuels when the world try to save the precious, low resources of fossil fuel and it is being uses up to a point sooner or later will be gone and it is not a reusable source. Going to biofuel, what is the main thing that made biofuel possible or as it is? Biofuel is made up of alcohol fermentation that comes from the process of ABE which stands for Acetone, Butanol, and Ethanol. What if there is something that will help increase the production of a fuel that are being obtained everyday for oils? What about a little twist to the ABE process, maybe for example, dyes, not just any dyes but an organic one. Methyl viologen is its name, and it is an tested before and evidences from a research paper in 1986s. It has been discovered that the result have shown that it made metabolism shift. Giving the idea that maybe it could do the same to the production of biofuel. The purpose of “Can it be dye” is to see if the dyes of methyl viologen and maybe neutral red will help the production of biofuel of ABE growing with bacteria, Clostridium Acetobutylicum. The reason to take the first step is to see if this simple idea will work before I can go in dept with other further experiments. The hypothesis of this experiment is the dyes will help the production of biofuel because of the characteristics of the dyes and it have been test that methyl viologen before from a research paper written in 1986, that it has cause significance in the change of metabolic shift. My result looking from the graph at the first one, it shows that MV standing for Methyl Viologen has increased the butanol production in regular clostridium medium. The line that looks like an “I” is showing how much each biofuel productions’ has increased because of methyl viologen; clearly the graph shows is stating that butanol is the one that has been largely produces more compared to the other biofuel in ABE. In other case of methyl viologen only having little effects on the biofuel production but on a particular one it does have an affect. In the second and third graph, there have been same test just re-tested. In the second one, the graph prove that MV is showing more effects towards the acetone more than butanol as it was before. Towards the data, it was a weird outcome, so I tested it again rerun the samples and it has a similar outcome. For the conclusion of this experiment is that the hypothesis was correct and the graph and data shows that the dyes will help the production of biofuel because of the characteristics of the dyes. It is true that the dye experiment tested by Dr. Rao and Mutharasan worked. I just took that idea and came up with this one to see if the dye will help the production of biofuel. With the helpful graph and data and results have made me to come to an conclusion that methyl viologen has help the production of biofuel a little and largely does not depend, all that matter was to tested the dye with the C. Acetobutylicum and median has created something affectedly.


Speaker/Facilitator

Wednesday January 19, 2011 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Glass Oaks Main Floor - Side Wing

6:30pm

Biophysical Characterization of DNA Ligase

The function of DNA ligases is to repair nicked DNA strands. One such enzyme, ChV ligase, requires ATP to complete the formation of the phosphodiester bond between the ends of a single-strand break. ChV ligase is the smallest known ATP-dependent ligase whose three-dimensional structure has been solved. By studying its interaction with nonspecific DNA, it is possible to determine the feasibility of the use of ChV ligase for future research. The protein, in its purified form, was combined with DNA, and the fluorescence anisotropies of different samples were measured. The anisotropy data points were fitted to standard equations to determine the dissociation constants of the DNA complexes with ChV ligase in its adenylated and apo states. The resulting dissociation constants, which show that the protein has a high affinity for nonspecific DNA, suggest that ChV ligase is an appropriate enzyme to test in future studies concerning protein translocation on nonspecific DNA.


Speaker/Facilitator

Wednesday January 19, 2011 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Glass Oaks Main Floor - Side Wing

6:30pm

Characterization of a neutrophil-like cell line

Severe burns leave patients vulnerable to infections since their body can be exposed to microorganisms through open wounds. Our lab has previously shown that fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 ligand (Flt3L) treatment after severe burn injury enhances bacterial clearance resulting in increased resistance to a burn wound infection. In vivo studies show that Flt3L treatment enhances neutrophil responses to burn wound infection; in vitro studies show that Flt3L enhances neutrophil migration in a DC-dependent manner. Neutrophils and dendritic cells (DCs) both play important roles in fighting infections in burn wounds and can interact and provide bidirectional activation. In order to determine if neutrophil-DC interactions and functions are altered by Flt3L, in vitro studies would be useful. MPRO cells are a neutrophil-like cell line that could provide an abundance source of cells for neutrophil studies. The purpose of this project was to characterize MPRO cells for various neutrophil characteristics. The expression of neutrophil proteins and in vitro migration, in the presence and absence of DCs, was examined. While there were some differences between neutrophils and MPRO cells, we found that MRPO cells may be suitable for studying migration and interactions with DCs in vitro.


Speaker/Facilitator

Wednesday January 19, 2011 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Glass Oaks Main Floor - Side Wing

6:30pm

Correlation Or Causation (BMI and GPA)

Students in today’s academic world are put into a highly competitive educational environment. Meaning that they are put under a variety of stress, which depends on their academic goals, and in turn, students must work hard in order to achieve them. GPA’s are one of the many determining factors of a young scholar’s future, as well as the PSAT. These are different ways to measure academic success. When measuring physical health, common tests are the fitness gram or BMI indicator tests. Whereas GPA’s take into account the number of AP classes a scholar takes and the overall grades a scholar has; the BMI or body mass indicator is a measure of height and weight which also takes into account a persons age. While GPA’s and PSAT scores can measure a person’s academic ability, the BMI measures physical health. Concluding the experiment, I’ve found that a student’s GPA doesn’t nessisarly affect their health, but rather the amount of stain the student is put under. Meaning that students with the most amount of time on academic activities had the least amount of sleep and the lowest hours of activity, and this is what caused their BMI’s to be not average. (look to the analysis for a further evaluation of the data.


Speaker/Facilitator

Wednesday January 19, 2011 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Glass Oaks Main Floor - Side Wing

6:30pm

Cyber Security Applications for Smart Phone: Recognizing Operating Code Pattern Differential among Users

Smart phones such as Apple Inc.’s iPhone, Google Inc.’s Android phones, and Blackberry devices have seen a recent rise in sales in recent years as consumers are exchanging their older and inefficient cellular devices for these new high-tech smart phones. As smart phones are becoming ubiquitous in daily life, security threats are emerging as well. With personal data being stored and location becoming prominent, hackers are becoming inclined to steal this valuable information. Security breaches now being more common on smart phones, a security application is needed to circumvent any attacks and protect the user. A security application has been constructed for a smart phone to address security issues. The application was programmed to function as a real-time integrity application. This application was given a filter for a user-account-control function for users to allow any program changes before they occur. Analysis results show the security application controlled noticeable program changes to a user's smart phone. However, the application cannot yet detect minute program changes which are the largest threats for a smart phone. With continued program changes the security application is projected to detect even the smallest of changes within filter levels to protect smart phones.


Speaker/Facilitator

Wednesday January 19, 2011 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Glass Oaks Main Floor - Side Wing

6:30pm

Effectiveness of Selected Oils in Inhibiting Microbial Growth of Staphylococcus epidermis

Oils are commonly used in folk medicine in healing various ailments from cuts and scrapes to burns and insect bites. The researchers aim to validate the effectiveness of selected natural oils in inhibiting the growth of ubiquitous microorganisms, Staphylococcus epidermis in in-vitro culture. In this scientific research, the effectiveness of selected oils will be tested to see if they inhibit the microbial growth of Staphylococcus epidermis. The selected oil that proves to be most effective will potentially be made into an ointment and be available to people with little to no access to antibiotics.


Speaker/Facilitator

Wednesday January 19, 2011 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Glass Oaks Main Floor - Side Wing

6:30pm

Effects of Biosorption of Pb+2 ions in H2O by different Algal Species

In other undeveloped countries the one source of water to survive is being contaminated be nearby mine tailing. Once the interests of the miner are extracted such are gold the mines are simply abandoned. Thus causes disease such cancer to spread through the human race. This experiment will help clean contaminated water and lower the percentage of disease. The main point of this project is to observe if algae can bio-extract the toxic lead from the water and which algae can extract the most. First I must collect as many containers as algal presented in this project, spring water, and a conductivity meter. Calculate all the mass of 0.001 Pb (No3)2 and in V=10mL of distilled water and the dilution. Insert the mass of 1mL of 0.001 Pb (No3)2 and in V=10mL of distilled water, 89 mL of spring water, and 10 mL of each sample of Algal into a container. Find the conductivity of spring water, spring water with Pb (No3)2 and spring water with algal. Next, collect new data every seven days and continue collecting data for two months and observe changes. Last dissect algal in each container and observe any change and collect conductivity for two months.


Speaker/Facilitator

Wednesday January 19, 2011 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Glass Oaks Main Floor - Side Wing

6:30pm

Electrical Energy Harvesting Through Piezoelectricity with Vibrations.

The purpose of this research project is to collect electrical energy from vibrating beams using piezoelectricity; essentially to create and store energy in a manner that will be environmentally friendly. The process begins with the constructed circuit with resistor, capacitor, rectifiers and an LED light bulb. The LED light bulb will be used to demonstrate the success of storing the electrical energy in the capacitor. The source of energy will be the constructed vibrating beam and the Piezoelectric (PZT) patch that will create electrical energy at the slightest bending motion of the patch. The benefits of the results of this experiment are not restricted to certain people but they are favorable to the entire global population by supplying environmentally friendly electrical energy. This will provide a form of renewable clean energy that can be beneficial to electrically powered organizations and the environment as well.


Speaker/Facilitator

Wednesday January 19, 2011 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Glass Oaks Main Floor - Side Wing

6:30pm

Extracting Heavy Oils Efficiently Using Janus Particles

Extracting Heavy Oils Efficiently Using Janus Particles We all know that the world is running out of the most important fuel source, Oil. What we don't know is that most of the oil is still in the ground. It is in the form of heavy oil, which is any type of crude oil that does not flow easily. It is referred to as "heavy" because its density is higher than the density of light crude oil. There is more than double the amount of Heavy oil that there is conventional oil. Well, why don’t we just get the heavy oils out? It is a little more complicated than that, because you see, it is very costly to extract the oils and it’s also not very environmentally-friendly. The purpose of my project was to create a compound that we can use to extract the heavy oils in a more efficient and environmentally-friendly way. In my project we are using ZrP-PNIPAM with Janus particle emulsions to create that compound. My hypothesis was that if we use ZrP-PNIPAM as Janus particles, they will stabilize oil-water emulsions depending on their temperature. So, by controlling the temperature we will be able to attract or release the oil. The independent variable was the ZrP-PNIPAM, the dependent variable was the percentage of exfoliation, and the controlled variable was the amount of TBAOH added. In conclusion, we have prepared the ZrP PNIPAM and have exfoliated it using TBAOH. We have also tested it using Mineral oil and the results came out positively. This compound will be more efficient than the current methods because it is environmentally-friendly and cost effective. It is environmentally-friendly due to the fact that it can be reused over and over without losing its chemical structure and the initial chemicals used are eco-friendly


Speaker/Facilitator

Wednesday January 19, 2011 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Glass Oaks Main Floor - Side Wing

6:30pm

How Storage Conditions Affect the Fruit Ripening Process

In my experiment, I tested two types of bags: Ziploc bags and "green bags" to see which one is the best choice to keep the peaches, lemons, and apples fresh for the longest time. I conducted three trials on the fruitsin those two types pf bags and the fruits placed on the counter served as my control group. All my observations about the changes in the fruits were recorded daily for seven days. I used the scoring chart to record the appearane of the fruits, took pictures and tested the fruits for the starch content with an iodine solution. The reason why i did that was so then my observations wouldn't just be based on my visual analysis. This led to my hypothesis proving correct becaue the fruits in the "green bags" stayed fresh for the longest time.


Speaker/Facilitator

Wednesday January 19, 2011 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Glass Oaks Main Floor - Side Wing

6:30pm

Hyper Active

This project is concerning the effect of caffeine on Daphnia’s heart rate. Daphnia is known as the water flea. Daphnia is a very small aquatic crustaceans and its body is divided into three main parts. Its heart is large and their skin is partially see-through. So it is easy to count the heart beat. In this experiment, place a daphnia onto a slide with a few drops of water and take its resting heart rate. After a number of trials add a solution with caffeine onto the slide and then take the heart rate again. Count the heart beat for 10 seconds and multiply the number by 6. When adding coffees to the slide, count the heart rate for 5 seconds and multiply the number by 12. Then take the average of each solution. The conclusion of this project is that coffee, Community, had the most effect on daphnia’s heart rate. The average heart rate for Community was 272 beats per minute.


Speaker/Facilitator

Wednesday January 19, 2011 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Glass Oaks Main Floor - Side Wing

6:30pm

Lactaid Action!

A great number of Americans are lactose intolerant. These people who suffer from lactose intolerance are caused uncomfortable symptoms consuming dairy foods. Today we have a very useful product called LACTAID® for lactose intolerant people. The Dietary Supplement LACTAID® converts this lactose into glucose and galactose. So I decided to test if this Dietary Supplement is capable of converting the disaccharide into glucose and galactose, and how much pressure is released during the fermentation of these sugar solutions. For both parts of the experiment, my hypotheses were supported. For the first part both whole and 2% milk the lactose solution came out negative and the lactose plus lactase solution came out positive. For the second part there were five test tubes: test tube 1 has lactose & lactase, test tube 2 has lactose only, test tube 3 had Lactose-Free milk, test tube 4 had a glucose tablet solution and test tube 5 had water. The average fermentation rates were: test tube 1 was 2.51 kp/min, test tube 2 was 0 kp/min, test tube was 1. 563, test tube 4 was 1.404 and test tube 5 was 0.


Speaker/Facilitator

Wednesday January 19, 2011 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Glass Oaks Main Floor - Side Wing

6:30pm

Locating an Earthquake using a G.S.N.

The purpose of this project is to locate the epicenters of worldwide earthquakes using archived seismometer data from a global network and to compare them to others so we can see the frequency of the earthquakes around the world. An earthquake is an example of a major geologic event that occurs suddenly. If you look at a map of historic earthquakes (USGS, 2007), you'll notice that most quakes occur near the boundaries between tectonic plates. At boundaries where the plates oppose one another, tremendous strains can build up between the plates. The strains are suddenly released when one plate slips against the other. The energy from this sudden movement travels through the earth as shock waves. The experiment was split into different continents and areas around the world but was looked at as whole in the beginning. By collecting earthquake data from those specific areas were created earthquake data and then those were compared to each area one by one to test my hypothesis. The data collected supported my hypothesis and made possible to make a conclusion.


Speaker/Facilitator

Wednesday January 19, 2011 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Glass Oaks Main Floor - Side Wing

6:30pm

Producing Bio-Ethanol from Fruit Peels

Currently, the world is consuming nonrenewable resources such as fossil fuels at a higher rate than it can be produced. This is degrading the environment, therefore; biodegradable wastes such as fruit peels are essential to be converted to ethanol in order to produce an alternative fuel. In this research, fruit peels will be broken down into sugar and then placed through the fermentation process to test for its ability to produce ethanol. Ethanol may be produced from fruit peels after fermentation. This research is conducted due to need for the development of feasible fuels in a cleaner and more cost effective manner. Discarded fruit peels are abundant thus providing clean, cheap fuel for the world. Through this study, potential biodegradable fuel can be produced.


Speaker/Facilitator

Wednesday January 19, 2011 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Glass Oaks Main Floor - Side Wing

6:30pm

Rational Design of Silicalite-1 using Tailored Organoamine Additives: Effect of Crystal Morphology for Clean Energy Applications

The effect of molecular additives on silicalite-1 cystallization is investigated in this research using a combination of optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to examine changes in crystal aspect ratio. Although various silicalite-1 synthesis procedures have been explored, the effect of organic amines on the crystal structure of zeolites has not been investigated in depth. Molecular additives were used as tailored inhibitors in the hydrothermal synthesis of silicalite-1 crystals. This study revealed the potential influence of inhibitors on the dimensions of silicalite-1 crystals.


Speaker/Facilitator

Wednesday January 19, 2011 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Glass Oaks Main Floor - Side Wing

6:30pm

Release the Power of the Sun!

When you are thirsty, you just grab a cup and turn on a faucet, right? But what about people in third world countries? Their main source of water is from wells, or from rivers clogged with pollution and waste. Sickness such a cholera is common because of the lack of clean water. When I conducted this experiment, my first goal was to build two identical water distilling devices. Unfortunately, I ran out of time, and only managed to build one distiller. I was disappointed, because this meant that I would have to change my topic. But a thought occurred to me: what if I just tested the use of the lens on a pot of water? I wouldn't be able to make any clean water, but I could find out if the water would even boil. My hypothesis was incorrect, however. The experiment was an overall success though. I found out that the use of the Fresnel lens is optimized when the sunlight is constant and intense. The outside heat didn't affect my experiment very much, so I plan to conduct my distilling experiment next summer when the temperature is better, and there is more sunlight.


Speaker/Facilitator

Wednesday January 19, 2011 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Glass Oaks Main Floor - Side Wing

6:30pm

Shape Memory Alloys

Shape Memory Alloys (SMA) are unique metals that can recover to their original shapes when heated above a certain temperature. We are trying to distinguish between the efficiency of NiTiPd and CoNiAl when processed into SMAs. NiTiPd is highly cost effective. We are conducting this experiment on CoNiAl, an inexpensive material. We want to discover if CoNiAl will have the same or an even better end result than NiTiPd. The problem we are facing is that CoNiAl can be beneficial only below the temperature of 100 C. We are attempting to see if the maximum temperature can be increased so it can replace NiTiPd. The CoNiAl that we are using is successful below 100 c. We can use NiTiPd above 100 c; but it is not an economical material. Using this material would not be practical. Procedure: 1: We acquired Co Ni Al compression sample in 4x4x8 mm dimension. 2: We applied constant compression, stress, and we constantly heated and cooled the sample. 3: While we were heating and cooling the sample, we recorded the strain and the temperature. 4: We plot strain versus temperature on a graph. 5: We used a MTS compression testing machine to test the strength and strain of the material. 6:We used a heating element on the machine to heat the sample. We used nitrogen to cool the sample. 7: We removed the sample of Co Ni Al. 8: We placed a sample of NiTiPd in the MTS compression testing machine and repeated all the steps above. 9: We compared our graphed results and concluded our experiment. We observed that at 400 C under 200 Mpa 0.5 hr is enough to create desirable precipitates. If we increase the time we would get weak shape memory response that means we will get low strains. Conclusion: CoNiAl is a promising high temperature SMA. It can be a substitute for NiTiPd. Ageing under stress before the experiment worked for CoNiAl to improve its shape memory characteristics.


Speaker/Facilitator

Wednesday January 19, 2011 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Glass Oaks Main Floor - Side Wing

6:30pm

Solar Powered Vehicle

Solar energy is the energy produced from the sun. Solar panel also known as photovoltaic cell, are used to convert solar energy from the sun into electricity. This project is about making of a solar powered vehicle which can be driven by suns energy. I also experimented some key factors which would help make an efficient solar panel car. I analyzed different angles at which solar panel work efficiently throughout the day and also the voltage changes of solar panel throughout the day. I concluded that the solar panel works most productively at 40-60 degrees angle. I measured the distance the vehicle traveled by being charged for different number of hours. I noticed that the car traveled for 12 ft in 3minutes and 5 seconds, after being charged for 2 hours and the car travelled at about 23 (ft.) in 7 minute. The car traveled at 54 (ft) in 9 minutes. Finally the vehicle was able to move at a distance of 86 feet in 12 minutes. I conclude that my first hypothesis was right, the second and last were proved false. A vehicle can efficiently work on solar energy and solar panels should be used in the world.


Speaker/Facilitator

Wednesday January 19, 2011 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Glass Oaks Main Floor - Side Wing

6:30pm

Study of detection PAH ( Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons) and E. Coli contamination on Greens Bayou

Greens Bayou plays a significant role in the environmental balance and survival of both native flora and fauna in Harris County. However, highway runoff water that flows into the bayou and the construction of concrete retaining walls change the chemistry and fluid dynamics of the water system. This study will determine the concentration of ubiquitous microorganism, E. Coli, and a chemical contaminant, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) in various part of the bayou. E. Coli is to be measured cultivating the water and seeing the amount of concentration of E. Coli from the sample. The detection of PAH will be used by a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The daphnia will be used as a habitat indicator to test the water. The heart rate of the daphnia will be measure to a control daphnia in spring water and see the heart rate to determine if it is suitable for life. Environmental quality is important in the sustainable growth of Harris County. Detailed study of the bayou will help the city planners understand the relationship between growth and sustainability.



Wednesday January 19, 2011 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Glass Oaks Main Floor - Side Wing

6:30pm

Study of Ozone Collection and Concentration Variation along I-10 Houston

Determination of ozone variation along I-10 in Houston is necessary for making environmental decisions especially improvement of air quality in the city. Air particles will be collected along I-10 to see what areas in Houston are most contaminated with “bad” ozone. Petroleum jelly and plastic discs will be used to collect air particles on a street level basis. Air particles will be collected in 6 different locations on I-10, specifically with major intersections. Samples will be recorded on a weekly basis and gas chromatography will be used to determine the concentration of ozone. The results of the study will be helpful for the public to learn what areas are most contaminated with “bad” ozone and how it is harmful.


Speaker/Facilitator

Wednesday January 19, 2011 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Glass Oaks Main Floor - Side Wing

6:30pm

Synthesis and Biological Recognition

Designing small organic molecules that bind tightly to proteins is a fundamental problem in discovering new therapeutic agents. Pharmaceutical companies such as Pfizer, spend so much money on finding a molecule that binds effectively and tries this with many molecules. In this multidisciplinary stream, I will learn how to model interactions between proteins and drug-like molecules using the computer program, PyMOL. Then I will design and synthesize novel molecules that target the protein MUP-I, and then determine their binding affinities using the technique of isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). I will learn in this stream some of the basic skills used by chemists and biologists to study protein–ligand interactions, a key step in drug discovery.


Speaker/Facilitator

Wednesday January 19, 2011 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Glass Oaks Main Floor - Side Wing

6:30pm

The absorption of NOx by using NaOH

NO2, a nitric oxide or NOx, is a gas found in the atmosphere, especially near roadways and in emissions. Ozone is formed when NOx and potentially hazardous organic compounds such as excess O2 and NO reacts with heat and sunlight to form NO2, which potentially leads to form other sorts of NOx. In vehicles, existence of NOx is 2-3 times higher than nearby area wide monitors. From gathered data by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, NO2 is 30-100% higher near roadways than concentrations away from roadways. When NOx reacts with ammonia, moisture, and other compounds, it forms small particles which penetrate into sensitive parts of the lung, when inhaled, and can cause and worsen respiratory disease, heart disease, and lead to premature death. Exposure to NO2 can cause respiratory effects, such as asthma and affects people living in housing units close to major highways, railroads, and airports. This affects particularly the elderly, children, and asthma asthmatics. The absorption of NOx by using a strong base could potentially reduce the amount of NOx present in the atmosphere. Thus, simulataneously, reducing NOx in the atmosphere, can also help reduce the risks of repiratory effects for asthmatics, the elderly, and children.


Speaker/Facilitator

Wednesday January 19, 2011 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Glass Oaks Main Floor - Side Wing

6:30pm

The Comparison Between Antibacterial Properties of Human Saliva and Penicillin

We are testing to see if dog saliva prohibits the growth of skin bacteria compared to human saliva and penicillin. To see which substance prohibits the growth of bacteria the most we placed each substance into a petri dish containing Staph. Epidermis and E. Coli. Going by research done previous to the experiment, we hypothesized that dog saliva will prohibit the growth of bacteria greater than human saliva and less then penicillin. According to other research, we predict that with dog saliva, it will prohibit the growth of the bacteria, but at the same time there will be a bacteria found in the saliva that will begin to grow around the saliva.


Speaker/Facilitator

Wednesday January 19, 2011 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Glass Oaks Main Floor - Side Wing

6:30pm

The Effect of Microorganism Presence on the Rate of Plant Growth

The population of human beings is increasing rapidly; therefore the food supply must also be increased. In this research, microorganisms will be killed to observe the effect it has on plant growth. By killing the microorganisms in the soil, the rate of plant growth will increase. Cups of soil will be placed in the microwave in order to kill the microorganisms. Then the seeds will be placed into the soil. The purpose of conducting this research is to determine whether soil without microorganisms is more beneficial to plants than soil with microorganisms. Microorganisms are already contained within the soil, consequently, no additional substances are required for to production of plants at a higher rate. Through this experiment, the rate of plant growth may increase while also saving resources.


Speaker/Facilitator

Wednesday January 19, 2011 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Glass Oaks Main Floor - Side Wing

6:30pm

The Intelligent Mailbox

Checking the mail on a cold winter or hot summer day only to come to the conclusion that nothing is inside, is considered a bother. The solution to this problem? An intelligent mailbox system capable of notifying its owner of a newly arrived delivery. Using currently available and easily obtainable technology is the foundation of this application based experiment. This project looks at the possibilities achievable with inexpensive Infrared technology as well as other components, to create an invisible barrier connected to sensors that will notify either through a wired or wireless connection between the mailbox and a home receiver. Applications for this apparatus range to a wide range of people. People living out in rural areas of the country/state might find a mailbox such as this one useful to their daily lives. Military applications also apply; Depending on the destination of the mail box’s placement, the power to know exactly when a certain letter or message has arrived might be vital in some parts of the army. The results and conclusions to this experiment in progress.


Speaker/Facilitator

Wednesday January 19, 2011 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Glass Oaks Main Floor - Side Wing

6:30pm

The Production of Microbial Biorenewable Chemicals

The Production of Microbial Biorenewable Chemicals Since E. coli is one of the most commonly used organisms for biotechnological applications, I will study its behavior under different experimental conditions in order to identify the most appropriate conditions for the efficient production of methyl-ketones and short-chain fatty acids. Since I want them to produce methyl-ketones and short chain fatty acids in the future I first have to figure out their resistance to different concentrations of fatty acids since too much fatty acids are toxic to the E. coli and too little will not be very productive. Basically I want to find the concentration and a specific fatty acid in which cells grow, but their growth shows some inhibition in order to later use them for later studies Also by doing the heat shock experiment I will be able to later perform direct gene analysis of over and under expressed genes using the scan array.What was basically done for the toxicity experiment was add a certain concentration of 2 different fatty acids into a growing population of E.coli varying from a concentration of 0,10,20,30,40 mM. Then their growth and resistance to the toxicity of the fatty acids is measured. For the heat shock you basically grow E.Coli at different temperatures and use the scan array to identify which genes were mostly affected and which are over and under expressed. There are many variables for this experiment. First of all for the Toxicity studies the variables are the two different acids Caproic acid (Hexanoic Acid), Caprylic Acid (Octanoic Acid) and their four different concentrations for each which hare 0mM, 10mM, 20mM, 30mM, and 40mM. Lastly for the heat shock the only variables are the temperature of 50 ° Celsius. In conclusion I found that when E.coli is grown with Caprylic acid and in the concentration of 10mM it grows at a slightly decreased rate compared to a concentration 0mM, but from this we acquire that this concentration of Caprylic acid is not very toxic to E. coli. Also as predicted in my hypothesis all samples with Caprylic acid were most resistant. For the heat shock experiment, I was successfully able to view the genes that were over- and under- expressed and view which genes are most dominant when compared with the 37ºCelsius and 50ºCelsius sample. This helps to be one step closer in being able to use the E.coli in the making of methyl-ketones and short chain fatty acids and making a future renewable resource.


Speaker/Facilitator

Wednesday January 19, 2011 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Glass Oaks Main Floor - Side Wing

6:30pm

The Study of Producing Sulfur Dioxide Absorbent Paint

Paint is a passive substance which if enhanced can be useful in improving air quality. Paint doped with SOx reducing chemicals are applied at a surface and its effectiveness is measured by comparing the variation in atmospheric SOx. The results show that chemicals mixed in with the paint is most effective on absorbing Sulfur Dioxide. This paint can later be used to reduce the amount of Sulfur Dioxide in the air pollution. This will be a good environmental product that can be used by factories to reduce the amount of Sulfur Dioxide being released in the air.



Wednesday January 19, 2011 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Glass Oaks Main Floor - Side Wing

6:30pm

The Unconstrained Truth About Constrained Layer-Damping

The purpose of this science fair experiment was to see if the size of constraining layer and damping layer in Constrained Layer-Damping would reduce or increase the effectiveness when damping the sound of an object. The experiment was tested using a microphone and a free audacity program. The microphone was used to measure the peak of the sound(dB) and the amount of time it took for the sound to completely stop. The audacity software was used to record and save all the data that was received from the microphone. Based on the data that was recorded in the experiment, results were extracted by observing the amount of time it took for the sound to go from start to silent and by observing the highest point in sound that was given off (peak). The hypothesis for this experiment was proven true because because the constraining-layer damper that had the largest surface area reduced the sound duration and the peak sound level the most in all 4 trials. In conclusion, the results show that the larger the constraining layer and damping layer, in proportion to the item you are trying to dampen, the more effective the CLD will be.


Speaker/Facilitator

Wednesday January 19, 2011 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Glass Oaks Main Floor - Side Wing

6:30pm

The Use of Iron Oxide to remove Arsenic from Water

Arsenic in drinking water, according to studies of National Academy of Sciences, causes bladder, lung and kidney cancer, harming the central and peripheral system of the nervous system. The article published by Allan H. Smith establishes the proposition that contaminated water can in fact have a mass concentration of arsenic in Third-World country water. “High levels of arsenic tend to be found more in ground water sources than in surface water sources of drinking water.” According to the USGS, 240 million people get their water from ground water which establishes the idea that 240 million might have a slight chance of obtaining water containing arsenic. Using iron oxide nanoparticles, and placing them in contaminated water, we are hypothesizing that the iron oxide’s magnetic pulse will attract to the arsenic having the nanoparticles and the arsenic together. We will use a centrifuge to separate the water from the particles and remove the particles from the water. We will use a method for screening water and detect if there is still any arsenic in the water and if this test is successfully completed, then there were would be a cost sufficient way of removing arsenic from water.


Speaker/Facilitator

Wednesday January 19, 2011 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Glass Oaks Main Floor - Side Wing

6:30pm

The Viscosity of Motor Oil

The purpose of this experiment is to test the viscosity of motor oil under different measures. The viscosity of four brands and four temperatures of oil will be tested to determine whether the viscosities of many brands of motor oil differentiate. Finally, the viscosity of synthetic and mineral oils will be tested to find out whether there is a difference in viscosity between the two. For this experiment, first heat 300mL of any oil. Then, as the oil reaches the appropriate temperatures, put a sample of 75mL of the oil into the corresponding beaker. Once the oils have cooled down to 70°C, pour the oil into a 100mL burette. Next, time how long the meniscus of the oil takes to flow from the 60mL mark to the 80mL mark. Record the data. Repeat these steps for each oil brand & type combination. This experiment shows that the viscosity of motor oil increases after it is heated. It has also proven that the Castrol brand is the most viscous of the Synthetic oils, and the Valvoline brand is the most viscous of the Mineral oils, and that mineral oils are more viscous than synthetic oils.


Speaker/Facilitator

Wednesday January 19, 2011 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Glass Oaks Main Floor - Side Wing

6:30pm

Use of In-organic Elements and Organic Fertilizers to Study In-Situ Bio-remediation of Oil

Oil pollution is a serious problem across the world and is considered as one of the worst environmental disasters. The clean up process is very time consuming and cost billions of dollars. Bioremediation is a process that uses naturally occurring microorganism to clean up oil spill. The process that accelerates the bioremediation process by adding nutrients is called bio-stimulation. The purpose of my project is to investigate the affects of in-organic element and organic fertilizer on the process of bioremediation in oil-contaminated water. In doing so, I created a bio-stimulation formula and compared it with organic fertilizers that were created from waste products. I did my experiment in four phases. In the first phase, I tried to find out if adding Nitrogen, Phosphorous, and Potassium accelerates the bioremediation process. In the second phase, I tried to find out if adding inorganic elements like Cr, K, Mg, NaCl, Fe, Zn, Ca, Se, and S increase the rate of bioremediation. In the third phase, I added all elements together to come up with a bio-stimulation formula. In the final phase, I tried to find out if organic fertilizers like cottonseed and fishbone meal increase bioremediation of oil as compared to the inorganic minerals. I conclude that adding Nitrogen, Phosphorous, and Potassium degrade oil faster and the oil remediated was 42.32%. Adding all the inorganic elements together remediated 90% of oil while using organic fertilizers remediated 92%. Therefore, I concluded that using organic fertilizers that are made from waste product are better than using in-organic elements.


Wednesday January 19, 2011 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Glass Oaks Main Floor - Side Wing

6:30pm

Virtual Drug Screening: CA7 Varying Enzyme Assay

Proteins (and particularly enzymes) are at the heart of most disease processes. The ability to effectively target and inhibit their function within the cell provides an opportunity to mitigate the deleterious outcomes of disease states in humans.Progressing a drug though initial binding assays, animal models and eventual human clinical trials can take 10-15 years and upwards of 800 million dollars.he VDS stream aims to implement a more efficient approach by using software programs to first understand the structural and chemical bonding relationships between the potential inhibitor drug and protein target. From these virtual arrangements, predictions can be made as to which molecules will bind the best while those with low scores are screened out. This method can be easily replicated and scaled up on the computer to analyze hundreds of thousands of molecules. Then the most likely drugs can be purchased and taken to the wet lab to validate their ability to inhibit the protein.


Speaker/Facilitator

Wednesday January 19, 2011 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Glass Oaks Main Floor - Side Wing

6:30pm

Weapon System Visualization and Signal Analysis ID Program for Converting Audio Signals Using Fourier Transform Algorithms

The purpose of this science project was to see if sound waves could be used to identify different weapon systems. When processing signals, such as sound waves, Fourier analysis can isolate individual components of a compound waveform, concentrating them for easier detection. The procedure was to record a weapon system’s sound wave with a digital sound recorder. The digital signal was transferred to a computer using a usb cable. The sound wave file was converted from mp3 format to wav format using the AVS file converter program. The digital signal was read into the MATLAB program and displayed. The spectrogram function was used to perform the Discrete Fourier Transform on the signal. The plot function was used to plot the graph. Data analysis consisted of analyzing the spectral analysis graphs and comparing them to see if each different weapon system had a unique output. The decibel levels for the weapon systems were each compared at the same frequencies. The conclusion was that each different weapon system had a unique spectral graph. Therefore, different weapon systems can be identified by using their unique Discrete Fourier Transform output signals.


Wednesday January 19, 2011 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Glass Oaks Main Floor - Side Wing

6:30pm

What is the best percentage of Nitrates, Phosphate, and Potassium that optimizes the growth of lettuce in a hydroponic solution?

Factory farms produce over 200 million pounds of waste each year, more than half of which cannot be recycled. Because of this more than eight American companies are beginning to use hydroponic methods to grow plants instead of factory farms. Hydroponics is defined as “a method of growing plants using mineral nutrient solutions, in water, without soil”. Hydroponic solutions are primarily made from a combination of phosphate, nitrate, and potassium (along with other chemicals such as calcium, magnesium, sulfur, zinc, boron, copper, and iron which are present in lower concentrations). Plants grown in hydroponic solutions are tomatoes, lettuce, various beans, as well as strawberries and other vegetables. Lettuce, in particular, grows best in a slightly acidic pH of 6.5. Hydroponics has been around since the nineteenth century but has only become a commonly used growing method in the recent decades. Because the hydroponic method of growing plants works without soil, it can be more easily transported and sanitized than soil utilizing methods. This experiment strives to test the effectiveness of inexpensive “home-made” hydroponic solutions when compared to the leading brand on the market. Five test solutions will be used to grow lettuce. Two of the test solutions will be made with organic food while the other three will be made with lab chemicals.



Wednesday January 19, 2011 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Glass Oaks Main Floor - Side Wing

6:30pm

Wireless Target Identification

Shooting competitions in the past are prone to inaccurate scoring. The reason is the methods used are very in-efficient. The methods that have been used in the past are either visually or by a special target called a “falling target”. Visually identifying targets proved to be the least accurate as targets can be as far as 1000 yards away. The “falling target” seemed to be a nuisance as you have to manually pick up the target once it has fallen. However, one way of accurate scoring and target detection is the use of a wireless transmitter and receiver pair. You can mount the transmitter on the back of a target, and receive the feedback of the shots with LED's on the receiver. This method of target detection is very accurate and also inexpensive. This system can also be expanded to up to 100 targets.


Speaker/Facilitator

Wednesday January 19, 2011 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Glass Oaks Main Floor - Side Wing
 
Thursday, January 20
 

7:30am

Breakfast
Thursday January 20, 2011 7:30am - 8:30am
~Ballroom Foyer Main Floor

8:30am

Creating a T-STEM Culture

Interested in finding out how to create a T-STEM Culture for your school that will inspire your students and make them feel a part of something great? This presentation will provide ideas on how to create a culture for your school that will do just that.


Speaker/Facilitator

Thursday January 20, 2011 8:30am - 9:00am
Concho Main Floor

8:30am

Sizzling Summer Sessions at SRT-STEM Center!

Beat the heat and come to Galveston this summer for the SRT-STEM Center Sizzling Summer Sessions at the University of Texas Medical Branch! Add a biotechnology twist to your life sciences and biology classroom curricula! Our Biotechnology Lessons for Teachers (BLT) Institute delivers a connected series of TEKS-aligned biotechnology content/intense hands on activities suitable for Middle School Life Science through High School Advanced Biotechnology! Meet expert scientists while becoming proficient in DNA extraction, column chromatography and gel electrophoresis; digestion using restriction endonucleases; Polymerase Chain Reaction; and more! Then, get REDE with the Rice Engineering Design Experience! Develop the knowledge and skills necessary to guide students through engineering design problems that integrate STEM concepts and meet the engineering TEKS. Participants have the opportunity to integrate design projects into science courses to enhance learning and give students a vision of the excitement and rewards of a STEM career. Don’t forget to LEGO! As an official LEGO Academy, you can learn everything you ever wanted to know about LEGO in one of our summer institutes! Use robotics to teach STEM concepts while building and programming LEGO robots to perform both simple and advanced challenges! See example activities,handouts and door prizes!


Speaker/Facilitator
MS

Marguerite Sognier

I am a research scientist at NASA JSC where I invent new biomedical technology and also the Executive Director of the SRT-STEM Center at UTMB. Visit our Center's webpage at www.utmb.edu/tstem


Thursday January 20, 2011 8:30am - 9:00am
Nueces Main Floor

8:30am

Transformation 2013--Instructional Support for STEM Education

Transformation 2013 specializes in support for schools implementing integrated STEM through project-based learning. From first steps in PBL to engineering capstone projects, Transformation 2013 provides PBL resources, face-to-face and online professional development, and summer camps for teachers to support STEM instruction.


Speaker/Facilitator
avatar for Stephanie Brierty

Stephanie Brierty

Stephanie is a T-STEM Education Specialist with the Transformation 2013 T-STEM Center out of Austin. In her former life, Stephanie worked for National Instruments as the K-12 Program Manager where she engineering, managed, and promoted new K-12 products. She has a BS in Materials Science and Engineering from Georgia Tech.


Thursday January 20, 2011 8:30am - 9:00am
Sabine Lower Floor

8:30am

Young Engineers and Scientists – Engaging Teachers in Space Research

Young Engineers and Scientists (YES) has been a community partnership between local high schools in San Antonio, Texas (USA), and Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) for the past 18 years. The goals of YES are to increase the number of high school students, especially those from underrepresented groups, seeking STEM careers, to enhance their success in entering the college of their choice, and to promote teacher development in STEM fields. This is accomplished by allowing students and teachers to interact on a continuing basis with role models at SwRI in real-world STEM research experiences. YES consists of an intensive three-week summer workshop held at SwRI where students and teachers experience the research environment and a collegial mentorship where they complete individual research projects under the guidance of SwRI mentors during the academic year. STEM teachers develop space-related lessons for classroom presentation and participate in an in-service workshop to share their developed classroom materials and spread awareness of space-related research. Partnerships between research institutes, local high schools, and community foundations can positively affect students’ preparation for STEM careers via real-world research experiences. We acknowledge support from NASA, Texas Space Grant Consortium, SwRI, and local charitable foundations.


Speaker/Facilitator

Thursday January 20, 2011 8:30am - 9:00am
San Antonio Lower Floor

8:30am

Developing Student's Potential

Have Questions? Collect and share ideas with your peers on DEVELOPING STUDENT POTENTIAL on your STEM campus. Our round table will allow extensive discussion and feedback surrounding ideas taken from the STEM Academy Design Blueprint. Discover ways to prepare your students to be the STEM Innovators of the 21st Century!


Speaker/Facilitator

Thursday January 20, 2011 8:30am - 9:30am
Trinity - back Lower Floor

8:30am

PBL Share-a-thon
Speaker/Facilitator
avatar for Kristian Trampus

Kristian Trampus

Kristian Trampus is a former oceanographer and chemistry teacher who currently serves as STEM Director of the Ingenuity Center and as Research Faculty at the University of Texas at Tyler.  Additionally, she serves as: Southeastern Liaison for AAUW to the National Girls Collaborative Project, Leadership Board – Texas Girls Collaborative Project, Certified GLOBE Teacher, TRC Project director,  EYH Coordinator (UT-Tyler and... Read More →


Thursday January 20, 2011 8:30am - 9:30am
Wedgewood Main Floor

8:30am

PBL Therapy: Why didn't my PBL work as planned?

This roundtable discussion will give educators a chance to discuss why their well-planned Project-Based Learning (PBL) lesson did not go as well as it could have. Participants can share their PBL concerns as well as share their successes.


Speaker/Facilitator
LS

Linda Stearns

Linda Stearns graduated with a B.S. in Geology and a M.S. in Mathamatics Education both from Texas A&M University. She taught secondary mathematics and science for 20 years before becoming the Associate Director for the Aggie-STEM center in 2008.


Thursday January 20, 2011 8:30am - 9:30am
Trinity - front Lower Floor

8:30am

Formative Assessment Throughout PBL

This workshop will invesitgate formative assessment and its role in guiding student work towards excellence. Participants will explore various strategies as well as methods to easily incorporate formative assessment into PBL.




Thursday January 20, 2011 8:30am - 10:00am
San Marcos Lower Floor

8:30am

Girls Go Gaga for Techbridge

Technology careers can seem very abstract to a young girl, especially without a role model. Many girls want to make the world a better place but don’t see how their interests connect with technology or engineering. Research has shown that role models and field trips to worksites are instrumental in encouraging girls to consider technology careers. Opportunities to see real-world applications of technology and meet with role models who work in technical fields are extremely impactful and can have a strong influence on a girl’s career path. But creating those connections are easier said than done. Techbridge has developed career exploration activities to stand in the place of a site visit or role model face-to-face when field trips just aren't possible. Techbridge and our partners at the Girl Scouts of Central Texas will provide guidance on how to organize a successful and impactful event for girls and role models alike. They will share resources and lessons learned. In addition, participants will take part in hands-on activities for K-12 students focused on career exploration.


Speaker/Facilitator

Thursday January 20, 2011 8:30am - 10:00am
Brazos Main Floor

8:30am

Investigating Hurricane Lili's Barometric Pressure and Wind Speed

Lili was a 2002 category four hurricane. Use this real world data and a graphing utility to create a scatterplot and determine the line of "best fit". This linear equation will be used to make estimates and predictions based on a model. This lesson would be an excellent choice to use as an interdisciplinary lesson with math, science, social studies, language arts, and computer literacy teachers.


Speaker/Facilitator

Thursday January 20, 2011 8:30am - 10:00am
Pecos Main Floor

8:30am

Project Based Learning and Engineering Design Using FRAME

This mini-workshop will provide teachers and administrators an overview of how engineering design can be integrated into project-based learning (PBL) and how both PBL and engineering design can be an integral part of STEM curriculum. The workshop will provide hands-on activities that will address specific content areas in STEM. Teachers and administrators will see how PBL and engineering design align with the College and Career Readiness Standards and the TEKS, and how to engage students research of the application of science and mathematics in order to be the next generation of innovators in engineering and technology.


Speaker/Facilitator

Thursday January 20, 2011 8:30am - 10:00am
Guadalupe Main Floor

8:30am

TAME Trailer

The TAME Trailblazer has been fitted with a variety of engineering and science exhibits and travels across the state. Alliance volunteers and/or the TAME central office arrange for the sponsored Trailblazer events which take place at schools or as part of a community or corporate event. Where possible, parents are invited to tour as well. Volunteers are stationed throughout the trailers to provide oral explanations and demonstrations of the exhibits. The Trailblazer continues to be an important outreach program and is made possible by generous support from Boeing, ConocoPhillips, Dow, Halliburton, Houston Museum of Natural Science, Marathon Oil Company, Shell Oil Company, United Space Alliance.


Speaker/Facilitator

Thursday January 20, 2011 8:30am - 10:00am
~ Parking Lot

9:30am

Finding the Win/Win in Parent Conflict

See how using a communication venue called a World Cafe can mitigate parent conflict and concerns and provide viable alternatives that improve communication and help to build community within your parents and students.  A World Cafe venue allows your team to manage contentious issues while promoting every voice to be heard and providing all stakeholders a sense of contribution, understanding and a way to connect ideas to really solve problems confronting your school



Thursday January 20, 2011 9:30am - 10:00am
Concho Main Floor

9:30am

Supporting Novice STEM Teachers Instructional Practices through PLCs

STEM teachers who are new to teaching need support in creating a classroom rich in inquiry and strong instructional practice. Novice teachers and alternatively certified teachers struggle with many factors that veteran teachers have mastered. Professional Learning Communities as well as coaching and mentoring are important factors in the developing craft knowledge that will lead to teacher retention and higher student achievement. This presentation is intended for Administrators, instructional specialists and STEM coaches to network about supporting new teachers through PLCs.


Speaker/Facilitator
avatar for Teresa K Talley

Teresa K Talley

Assistant Director for Professional Support, Accelerate Learning
I work with the SRT-STEM Center at UT-Medical Branch in Galveston. As the Co-Director for Education Outreach I have the opportunity to work with STEM Academies and STEM Designated Campuses in the implementation of 21st Century Skills for the development of our future workforce. I am passionate about classroom pedagogy and the instructional strategies that bridge the gap in student knowledge and teacher effectiveness. I works as a mentor and... Read More →


Thursday January 20, 2011 9:30am - 10:00am
San Antonio Lower Floor

9:30am

Taking Science Outdoors

Science is all around us everyday, so why do we limit our students to 4 boring walls. Get them outside to experience science first hand. I will show you ways to turn any area into an outdoor learning area for all grades. I will have ideas for projects for your students to do that are TEKS based. Science is ripe for Project Based Learning (PBL) so why not utilize the natural areas around your campus and let your students have fun while they learn.


Speaker/Facilitator
DH

David Hayes

I am the Science Chair and 8th grade teacher at Mexia Junior High.


Thursday January 20, 2011 9:30am - 10:00am
Nueces Main Floor

9:30am

The Curriculum Connection: Keeping the curriculum at the heart of PBL

This session will explore the intitial planning of the PBL from the standards and curriculum given in the context of multiple settings. From mandated scope and sequence to benchmarks, it is possible to create PBL's that are authentic and meaningful. This session will use some basic principles of instruction by design and tools for teachers in multiple areas. In addition, this session will illustrate the curriculum content throughout the PBL utilized in Humanity classrooms within current T-STEM Academies.


Speaker/Facilitator

Thursday January 20, 2011 9:30am - 10:00am
Sabine Lower Floor

9:30am

The Ingenuity Center

Find out what we can do for you.  Join us for this presentation, question/answer session to find out about all the programs the Ingenuity Center has to offer. The Ingenuity Center (formerly the East Texas STEM Center) is a component of the Texas Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (T-STEM) Initiative designed to build on national, state and local efforts to improve science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) achievement among Texas students. The Ingenuity Center focuses on increasing the number of students who study and enter science, technology, engineering, and math career pipeline by providing programs to teachers and students.


Speaker/Facilitator
avatar for Kristian Trampus

Kristian Trampus

Kristian Trampus is a former oceanographer and chemistry teacher who currently serves as STEM Director of the Ingenuity Center and as Research Faculty at the University of Texas at Tyler.  Additionally, she serves as: Southeastern Liaison for AAUW to the National Girls Collaborative Project, Leadership Board – Texas Girls Collaborative Project, Certified GLOBE Teacher, TRC Project director,  EYH Coordinator (UT-Tyler and... Read More →


Thursday January 20, 2011 9:30am - 10:00am
Wedgewood Main Floor

10:00am

Break - Snacktime
Thursday January 20, 2011 10:00am - 10:30am
~Ballroom Foyer Main Floor

10:30am

PBLs and AP English - A Good Combination!

It is possible to integrate PBLs into the Advanced Placement curriculum - in fact, my students have improved their performance on the AP test since I started teaching primarily through Project Based Learning. This workshop will propose ways that AP teachers can prepare their students for success on AP tests through engaging and purposeful Project Based Learning. While many projects are geared for English classes, there are many projects that could easily transfer over to the AP history courses. Participants in this workshop will walk away with at least five different Project Based Learning projects - complete with lesson plans, objectives, and applications tied into the AP English Language and Composition Test and the AP English Literature and Composition Test. If you are looking for ways to integrate PBL into your humanities/English/history class, this workshop is for you!


Speaker/Facilitator

Thursday January 20, 2011 10:30am - 11:00am
Pecos Main Floor

10:30am

STEM Education for Girls: Girlstart

In this presentation, Girlstart proposes an informational talk on innovative, informal STEM education models particularly for girls and nontraditional learners. Founded in Austin in 1997, Girlstart is one of the few community-based informal education nonprofits in the nation specifically dedicated to empowering and equipping K–12 girls in STEM. Since its inception, Girlstart has served more than 22,000 girls and 5,500 teachers and families through school- and community-based programs—held at the Girlstart Science & Technology Center in Austin and other venues throughout Central Texas—including afterschool clubs, summer camps, science career conferences and expos, large-scale science events for families, teacher professional development, online teaching and learning resources, and virtual learning communities. Girlstart's presentation will also include discussion concerning expansion of its programs outside of Central Texas ('Girlstart To Go') as well as opportunities for peer collaboration, partnerships, and resource sharing.


Speaker/Facilitator
avatar for Tamara Hudgins

Tamara Hudgins

Girlstart’s mission is to empower and equip girls in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). We accomplish our mission by developing innovative STEM programs for girls, teachers, and families, thereby empowering girls to achieve in STEM education, and feed the national STEM workforce.


Thursday January 20, 2011 10:30am - 11:00am
Brazos Main Floor

10:30am

Texas Tech T-STEM Center

This presentation will highlight the professional development, research, and resources that the Texas Tech T-STEM Center has to offer to administrators and teachers at T-STEM Academies and all Texas schools.


Speaker/Facilitator

Thursday January 20, 2011 10:30am - 11:00am
Guadalupe Main Floor

10:30am

Problem-based Learning- A tool for preparing the future biomedical and STEM workforce

A great many professions, including the biomedical sciences, need individuals that are accomplished problem-solvers and self-directed learners. The very nature of scientific research necessitates that scientists must be self-directed learners for their entire professional life. As knowledge in a given field changes, scientists must be able to adapt to new and unexpected challenges and discoveries. Issues such as these support the development of problem-based, student-centered, self-directed programs that promote the development of problem-solving and group interaction skills and at the same time allow each and every student to experience a mode of learning tailor-made to meet each student’s individual needs. Let us engage you in how PBL plays a vital role in the preparation of tomorrow’s biomedical students and STEM workforce.


Speaker/Facilitator
MS

Marguerite Sognier

I am a research scientist at NASA JSC where I invent new biomedical technology and also the Executive Director of the SRT-STEM Center at UTMB. Visit our Center's webpage at www.utmb.edu/tstem


Thursday January 20, 2011 10:30am - 11:30am
Trinity - front Lower Floor

10:30am

Which kinds of classroom projects motivate and prepare secondary students for engineering and technical careers?

Of the thirty projected fastest-growing occupations through 2016, sixteen of them require substantial mathematics or science preparation. Historically, engineering and technical careers have been a primary upward economic path for students from disadvantaged backgrounds but today such students are severely underrepresented in these careers, and too few students overall are prepared to meet projected workforce needs. Recent studies show that design-based teaching of science concepts results in superior student knowledge gain, engagement, and retention compared to scripted-inquiry teaching. Students working to solve interesting, real problems see the relevance of science and mathematics skills, are motivated to master those skills, and have the opportunity to practice them in a process that is fundamentally different from learning science and mathematics through expository instruction.


Speaker/Facilitator

Thursday January 20, 2011 10:30am - 11:30am
Trinity - back Lower Floor

10:30am

Biotechnology Lessions for Teachers: Cutting UP....with Enzymes!

Add a biotechnology twist to your life sciences and biology classroom curricula! Our BLT Workshops deliver a series of TEKS-aligned biotechnology content/activities suitable for Middle School Life Sciences through High School Advanced Biotechnology! Find out more and participate in a series of example activities you can use!


Speaker/Facilitator
MS

Marguerite Sognier

I am a research scientist at NASA JSC where I invent new biomedical technology and also the Executive Director of the SRT-STEM Center at UTMB. Visit our Center's webpage at www.utmb.edu/tstem


Thursday January 20, 2011 10:30am - 12:00pm
Nueces Main Floor

10:30am

Examview in all Details

The ExamView is a comprehensive solution for creating, administering, and scoring tests. The software includes many features to save you time and generate information to assess and improve student performance. At the end of this workshop the participant will be able to a- Create a paper test. b- Print multiple versions of the same test. c- Enter their custom questions. d- Prepare an online test, study guide, and worksheet. e- Publish study guides, quizzes and tests using a local area network. f- Create or import a class roster. g- Administer and score an online test. h- Prepare a variety of useful class and student reports. i- Import questions created in word format. and also introduction of creating dynamic type questions.


Speaker/Facilitator

Thursday January 20, 2011 10:30am - 12:00pm
San Antonio Lower Floor

10:30am

Innovative ways to use Web 2.0 technologies in the classroom

Come join us for this popular workshop where teachers explore and integrate technology for meaningful learning. Teachers will learn to evaluate technology components, online platforms in terms of learning theories and goals.  These products include audio, visual, and multimedia products as well as new products as they are made available.  Teachers will learn to produce learning aids in several media forms.  Ultimately, teachers will research the various forms of educational technology, develop artifacts that define what they know and are able to do. Bring your laptop!

 

 

 


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Speaker/Facilitator
avatar for Kristian Trampus

Kristian Trampus

Kristian Trampus is a former oceanographer and chemistry teacher who currently serves as STEM Director of the Ingenuity Center and as Research Faculty at the University of Texas at Tyler.  Additionally, she serves as: Southeastern Liaison for AAUW to the National Girls Collaborative Project, Leadership Board – Texas Girls Collaborative Project, Certified GLOBE Teacher, TRC Project director,  EYH Coordinator (UT-Tyler and... Read More →


Thursday January 20, 2011 10:30am - 12:00pm
Wedgewood Main Floor

10:30am

LabQuest Motion Detection

Participants will learn to use Vernier LabQuest hand-helds in conjunction with Vernier motion detectors. Participants will utilize programs arleady existing within LabQuest and also learn how to create their own settings and experiments.


Speaker/Facilitator

Thursday January 20, 2011 10:30am - 12:00pm
Sabine Lower Floor

10:30am

Physics and Chemistry Labs and Projects You Can Do In Your Class Tomorrow!

Learn new and exciting hands-on Physics and Chemistry labs and projects that all teachers can do in their classroom immediately. All the equipment that is used for these labs and activities can easily be found in local stores. The labs and activities include building the following; an operation game while studying circuits, chemical torpedoes, a laser oscilloscope, a toy that returns using potential energy, police drag sleds to study friction, CD spin top, simple conduction aluminum foil device, camera capacitor demo, mardi gras beads showing Newton's 1st law, and much more. During this mini-workshop, partcipants will "make and take" several different projects and labs!


Speaker/Facilitator
avatar for Deborah Armstrong

Deborah Armstrong

Physics, Engineering, and Robotics Teacher, Mineola High School
I teach Physics, Robotics, and Engineering at Mineola HS.


Thursday January 20, 2011 10:30am - 12:00pm
San Marcos Lower Floor

10:30am

“The Colony” Goes on “The Road”: An ELA/Tech/Science/History Smash-Up

Integrating the basic tenets of STEM into a history or English classroom can be not only challenging, but at times near impossible.  Today’s teachers, even in STEM classrooms, are constantly bombarded with the same issues as every other teacher: raising test scores, student-centered learning, improving performance….  But STEM teachers have an added responsibility: specifically bringing science, tech, engineering and math into their teaching and projects.  Not having a background in these disciplines can be really daunting regarding lesson planning for your literature or studies of historical events.  All it takes is seeing your curriculum in a new way, and working jointly (regularly!) with your team members with the expertise to help you teach, create, and design strategies that not only engage your students, but also continue to emphasize the interdisciplinary nature and real-life application of our programs.  This is a movement beyond project development and simple team planning.  This session will enlighten you with a variety of practical (and fun!) lesson/project planning ideas for bringing STEM into your English or History classrooms, and will involve an interactive model PBL using a combination of the following: a study of Cormac McCarthy’s The Road in a dystopian literature unit, a scientific inquiry and experiment under disastrous environmental conditions, and inventions developed to survive under such conditions, much like on television’s “The Colony.” 


Speaker/Facilitator
MA

Molly Adams

Currently in process of setting up a blog, but I am currently listed on the following sites: http://nstwritingproject.ning.com/ and http://www.northstaroftexaswritingproject.org/. I am also a part of the National Writing Project site at http://www.nwp.org.


Thursday January 20, 2011 10:30am - 12:00pm
Concho Main Floor

11:30am

Developing a Flex Schedule for STEM Advisory and Innovative Classes in a Small, Rural School

This session will highlight how New Deal High School has modified its Friday afternoon schedule to provide students with more resources promoting college, career, and life readiness through short innovative (non-TAKS) flex classes along with advisory time spent interacting with college and business partners. We will share our experiences in developing a Flex Schedule for Friday afternoons and how we are partnering with the Texas Tech STEM Center to offer innovative flex courses such as robotics and rocketry to expose students to STEM related fields. We will share the types of flex courses we are currently providing along with feedback gathered from teacher and student surveys about what to consider and to avoid if you plan on implementing this type of schedule.


Speaker/Facilitator

Thursday January 20, 2011 11:30am - 12:00pm
Guadalupe Main Floor

11:30am

Excite Kids Through Effective Science, Technology, Engineering and Math Messaging

To change the demographics of engineers and scientists - to increase the diversity of those pursing science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields - the conversation must change. The University of Texas at Austin Women in Engineering Program and the Texas Girls Collaborative Project share effective imagery and messaging that engages K-12 students in formal and informal STEM education and excites them about the possibilities of STEM careers. Learn the latest research about engaging girls in STEM and explore the research-based best practices in messaging and hands-on activities that connect a diverse population in the excitement of STEM.


Speaker/Facilitator
avatar for Tricia Berry

Tricia Berry

Director, Texas Girls Collaborative Project (TxGCP)& Director, Women in Engineering Program (WEP) at The University of T, The University of Texas at Austin
tsberry@mail.utexas.edu | | Named one of the 100 Women Leaders in STEM by STEMconnector at the 2012 US News STEM Solutions Summit, Tricia Berry leads efforts to connect those working to advance gender equity in STEM fields. As Texas Girls Collaborative Project Director, she leads the dissemination of STEM resources across Texas in coordination with the National Girls Collaborative Project. She concurrently serves as Women in Engineering... Read More →


Thursday January 20, 2011 11:30am - 12:00pm
Brazos Main Floor

11:30am

The Ups and Downs of STEM in a Zero-G Environment

Motivate students to excel in STEM classes and to pursue related careers by involving them with unique opportunities. Discover how teachers at New Deal High School are sparking their students' interests using a student-developed experiment implemented aboard a reduced-gravity aircraft at NASA and carried out by their teachers. Learn how to implement project-based learning by using curriculum developed by NASA, by the NSTA, and by a little bit of home-grown ingenuity.


Speaker/Facilitator

Thursday January 20, 2011 11:30am - 12:00pm
Pecos Main Floor

12:00pm

Yvonne Spicer - Special Guest Luncheon Speaker

Dr. Yvonne M. Spicer serves as NCTL Associate Director for Formal Education (K-12) at Museum Of Science since January 2006. She is currently Director of Career & Technical Education for the Newton Public Schools. A National Science Foundation Program Reviewer, she also taught drafting, architecture, graphic arts, and photography in the Framingham Public Schools for many years, earning several awards, including the 1995 Anti-Defamation League's "A World of Difference" ... Teacher Incentive Award.


Speaker/Facilitator

Thursday January 20, 2011 12:00pm - 1:30pm
~ Ballroom A Main Floor - Renaissance Arboretum, Austin, Texas

12:00pm

TAME Trailer

The TAME Trailblazer has been fitted with a variety of engineering and science exhibits and travels across the state. Alliance volunteers and/or the TAME central office arrange for the sponsored Trailblazer events which take place at schools or as part of a community or corporate event. Where possible, parents are invited to tour as well. Volunteers are stationed throughout the trailers to provide oral explanations and demonstrations of the exhibits. The Trailblazer continues to be an important outreach program and is made possible by generous support from Boeing, ConocoPhillips, Dow, Halliburton, Houston Museum of Natural Science, Marathon Oil Company, Shell Oil Company, United Space Alliance.


Speaker/Facilitator

Thursday January 20, 2011 12:00pm - 1:30pm
~ Parking Lot

1:30pm

Design Curriculum[]Curriculum Design: Facing the 21st Century Engineering Grand Challenges

Margaret Mead advised, "Never doubt that a small group of people can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has." Commensurate with her notion, our engineering education team faces the Grand Challenges with design-based learning. Our inter-disciplinary and inter-institutional team a) implements design-based, active learning experiences to b) engage middle and high school teachers in critical thinking and STEM literacy practices and c) guide them towards fostering STEM learning with considerations for underrepresented groups. Creation of this professional development hails from across disciplines and institutions in an effort to meet complex societal needs with STEM education. We believe that contextualization of design within the framework of global goals provides the learning communities with opportunities to understand that anyone with a STEM education can be a change agent for society. This professional development program, curricula, and developed support network strives to meet the dynamic and multifaceted needs of teachers and students by integrating design-based learning through the context of the Grand Challenges. Constructs of secondary school STEM teaching and learning are shown, the interworking of our team are discussed and exemplar results of successful design curricula are presented.


Speaker/Facilitator

Thursday January 20, 2011 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Sabine Lower Floor

1:30pm

Preparing High School Teachers to Teach Design-Based Activities

The Rice Engineering Design Experience (REDE) is developing and implementing a comprehensive professional development program for in-service high school teachers to prepare them to teach engineering design and problem solving, and to use design-based teaching approaches in their science curriculum. The program uses a constructionist, immersion pedagogy as part of an unconventional three- phase learning cycle. Pre- and post-test results for the first summer workshop indicate significant gains in understanding the engineering design process among the teachers. The second year of the program will focus on developing and implementing design-based curriculum modules covering science concepts. The presentation will describe a similar evaluation of the 2010 workshop, and the changes in first-year classroom practice using observations by outside evaluators. Best practices, lessons learned, and remaining challenges will be discussed.


Speaker/Facilitator

Thursday January 20, 2011 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Nueces Main Floor

1:30pm

Project E3: Expanding Energy Education

Project E3: Expanding Energy Education is an interdisciplinary curriculum for grades K—12 featuring 24 hands-on discovery activities and issues related to earth science and energy themes. Correlated to the TEKS, it includes science, social studies, math, physics, language arts, and environmental activities. During the grade-appropriate Offshore Energy Center’s workshops, teachers learn about the curriculum plus other exciting classroom resources. The Offshore Energy Center has facilitators throughout the state that can possibly facilitate free workshops in your district. Each participant who attends one of our 6 hour workshops receives a FREE guide that has been expanded to 50 + lessons, access to our traveling trunks filled with additional activities, and 6 hours of CPE and TEEAC credit. Come learn about our Mobile Offshore Learning Unit (MOLU) that we have been taking to designated cities in Texas. These trips have been fully funded by the Foundation for Energy Education.


Speaker/Facilitator

Thursday January 20, 2011 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Concho Main Floor

1:30pm

The Aggie STEM Center: Our Services and Research-Based Effects

The Aggie STEM Center, located at Texas A&M University in College Station, is a professional development center for STEM education. The center researches, creates and provides research-based professional development and other services for high-quality, secondary-level STEM teaching and learning. This presentation will provide descriptive information on the center's services and publications as well as the center's research-based effects.


Speaker/Facilitator

Thursday January 20, 2011 1:30pm - 2:00pm
San Antonio Lower Floor

1:30pm

Making Sense of T-STEM

The Design Blueprint is a tool used by the TEA and T-STEM staff to evaluate the progress of each T-STEM academy. The blueprint is also used by the academies as a guideline for implementation. To use the blueprint effectively, we at the T-STEM Academy in Sinton have developed a matrix that incorporates the seven benchmarks from the blueprint and the strands that follow each benchmark. This will enable us to read and reflect as a team on each strand and evaluate the strength and weakness of our program based on those strands. It is functional and meaningful to use.


Speaker/Facilitator

Thursday January 20, 2011 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Trinity - front Lower Floor

1:30pm

What is the engineering design process and how does it intergrate into project-based learning?

This roundtable will discuss what is meant by the "engineering design process," how it intergrates into project-based learning and how the engineering design process can be applied to any discipline to help students become critical thinkers.


Speaker/Facilitator

Thursday January 20, 2011 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Trinity - back Lower Floor

1:30pm

Class on a Chip

Class on a Chip Micro and nano technologies have revolutionized many aspects of our lives from computers to biomedicine. The process of miniaturization has now been applied to educational laboratory equipment, allowing macroscale systems to be shrunk to fit on a computer chip. The Class on a Chip System is an array of computer controlled microdevices on a small silicon chip that permit numerous laboratory experiments and demonstrations to be carried out under a microscope. Simple, on-screen controls allow anyone to operate microscale motors and other devices. The System is intended for use in high school physics, engineering, and technology classes. It is used to teach fundamental STEM concepts, as well as significantly improving awareness and knowledge of micro and nano technologies. This education tool is a paradigm shifting system that has the potential to transform science and engineering education at many levels. The Class on a Chip System will significantly impact learning outcomes by immersing students in an interesting and knowledge building environment using advanced, interactive micro-technologies. The System incorporates state-of-the-art microdevices, but is accessible by a broad range of students. In this workshop, participants will utilize the Class on a Chip System to conduct a couple of representative experiments and evaluate the curriculum under development.


Speaker/Facilitator
TD

Tim Dallas

Associate Profess of Electrical Engineering, Texas Tech University; President - Class on a Chip, Inc.


Thursday January 20, 2011 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Guadalupe Main Floor

1:30pm

Engaging Non-Linear Thinkers: Prezi and collaborative technology in the social science classroom and workplace

Prezi is a free web-based presentation tool which appeals to a broad spectrum of learning styles in an innovative non-linear format. Although it was created for math instruction, Prezi adapts readily to the demands of socials sciences. It easily incorporates diverse multimedia, allows your audience to visualize historical events in context, and enables you to map out thematic connections to reinforce the "big picture".  This session will explore how Prezi can be utilized by educators, administrators, and students, including real-world demonstrations from an undergraduate history course.  Participants will have the opportunity to collaborate in real time on a special presentation, so bring your laptops!


Speaker/Facilitator
avatar for Samantha Winn

Samantha Winn

Collections Archivist, Virginia Tech
Emerging archives professional, researcher, and technical writer with an interest in facilitating the participation of women and girls in STEM careers, advancing the preservation of architectural records, and promoting equitable access to cultural heritage materials of underserved communities. She graduated from Drexel University in June 2014 with her MLIS and a concentrations in archives.


Thursday January 20, 2011 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Wedgewood Main Floor

1:30pm

Making the Connections: Integrating Mathematics and Science Inquiry

Mathematics is the language of science; yet, students may perform very well in math class, but never transfer this knowledge to science lessons. Science and mathematics teachers are familiar with their TEKS, but may or may not be cognizant of what skills students have previously mastered in other subjects. Being able to integrate knowledge of mathematics and science requires that students develop higher level thinking skills. To help students develop these skills, teachers can provide open-ended activities. These require the students to design and carry out experiments such as making rain with a limited number of classroom and laboratory materials. As their comfort level increases, students begin to use problem-solving strategies which allow them to generate knowledge new to themselves. They become more efficient and effective in their use of materials, and they quickly discover the steps necessary to answer the questions posed in the activity. The activities you will do in this workshop require integration of both their math and science, making applications of both while engaging in problem solving/critical thinking. Teaching strategies are modeled, content information is given, and teachers are asked to construct their own knowledge of alternatives to "cookbook" labs and "stand-up and tell" methods


Speaker/Facilitator

Thursday January 20, 2011 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Pecos Main Floor

1:30pm

Teaching science with T-STEM best practices: Inquiry and PBL.

The new 2011 Science TEKS require at least 40% of instructional time be dedicated to investigations. This mandate can be overwhelming to even the most experienced teacher. Fortunately, research shows that teaching science as inquiry provides teachers with the opportunity to develop student abilities and to enrich student understanding of even the most difficult concepts. Using Project Based Learning provides a focus to investigate aspects of the world around them and enables the processes of doing investigations. This session will focus on the connection between Inquiry and PBL in the teaching of science in the T-STEM classroom. Come join us for a hands-on, minds-on time!


Speaker/Facilitator
DW

Donna Wise

I am an education coach and professional development instructor.


Thursday January 20, 2011 1:30pm - 3:00pm
San Marcos Lower Floor

1:30pm

The Mulitmedia Classroom

Bring science to life with technology! Learn how to integrate an intelligent board in your classroom and increase student engagement. Girlstart will demonstrate the different types of technology they use in their popular summer camps and after school clubs. Participants will explore ways to increase classroom STEM integration and student participation.


Speaker/Facilitator
avatar for Girlstart

Girlstart

sharlym@girlstart.org


Thursday January 20, 2011 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Brazos Main Floor

2:30pm

Building a Balanced Literacy Community

This session discusses one charter school system’s journey towards building a K-12 balanced literacy community. Join us as we share a vision for a balanced literacy classroom founded on research based beliefs and practices. Participants will examine the how effective literacy instruction can promote project based learning and college and career readiness.


Speaker/Facilitator

Thursday January 20, 2011 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Sabine Lower Floor

2:30pm

PBL Leadership Academy

I'm an Instructional Leader (Administrator, Instructional Coach, Teacher Leader, etc.) and my school has embraced Project Based Learning. I've been to the teacher training; I've even helped plan a PBL unit, but I need more. If you've felt this way, the PBL Leadership Academy from the Ingenuity Center at UT Tyler may be your answer. In this session, you will learn about Professional Development for Project Based Instruction designed specifically for Instructional Leaders. The critical attributes of Project Based Instruction, how to evaluate the proficiency of a PBL teacher, and developmental supervision of PBL teachers will be discussed.


Speaker/Facilitator

Thursday January 20, 2011 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Concho Main Floor

2:30pm

STEM Hunt: The Making of a PBL Video Production

Students were dropped off in downtown San Antonio and were charged with using the cultural heritage, traditional landmarks and major structural facets of engineering to discover natural connections between the core subject areas and develop a marketing video for a targeted audience.  Based within a scavenger hunt genre, students were given specific tasks within the core disciplines to apply in a real world setting and encouraged to use their own poetic license in developing a cohesive co-curricular video production.  Planning templates and grading rubrics will be provided and logistical challenges will be discussed in providing a field experience to build a relevant engaging PBL that culminated in a STEM Academy Awards night with parents and students for best video productions.



Thursday January 20, 2011 2:30pm - 3:00pm
San Antonio Lower Floor

2:30pm

TEXAS STEM Career Connections! Professions Sessions Series Kickoff!

In order to fulfill the “T-STEM mission of increasing the numbers of students who pursue postsecondary studies in STEM-related fields, we must increase the number of opportunities those students have to be exposed to STEM professionals”. Designed as a compliment to the STEM Academy experience, the "STEM Professions Sessions" series, promises to inform and inspire students to take a serious look at STEM careers in the context of actual industry clusters located in Texas. The multi-media online series will feature STEM professionals telling their career-focused stories. Join the Southeast Regional T-STEM Center as we provide an overview of this series and a sneak peak at the first session. Ways to incorporate the series in the classroom will follow along with general discussion.


Speaker/Facilitator
MS

Marguerite Sognier

I am a research scientist at NASA JSC where I invent new biomedical technology and also the Executive Director of the SRT-STEM Center at UTMB. Visit our Center's webpage at www.utmb.edu/tstem


Thursday January 20, 2011 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Nueces Main Floor

3:00pm

Break - Snacktime
Thursday January 20, 2011 3:00pm - 3:30pm
~Ballroom Foyer Main Floor

3:30pm

Center for STEM Education & Research at UT Dallas

The Center for STEM Education and Research (C-SER), realizing the potential of lifelong learners to merge theory and practice, was created to design innovative science, engineering, and math curricula; deliver professional development to teachers; and create strategic partnerships among business, higher education entities, and school districts to support the effective implementation of STEM initiatives.


Speaker/Facilitator

Thursday January 20, 2011 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Pecos Main Floor

3:30pm

Creative Application of Social Studies; A Multi-Year PBL

For a major Social Studies PBL, BHS STEM Academy freshman constructed their own detailed, imaginary continent in World Geography. Then, as sophomores, each student creatively developed a series of civilizations on their created continent. These civilizations paralleled our real world’s stages of history, and so demonstrated understanding of information learned over the course of the school year. As the PBL enters the second semester, students become a members of a group that digitally creates their own planet using their existing continents from World Geography. During the final six weeks, a Web Page created by the group will showcase the history of each digital "world" beginning with the River Valley Civilizations through the Middle Ages. This web page will form the final product for the year and students will showcase their planet's “history” to invited experts.


Speaker/Facilitator

Thursday January 20, 2011 3:30pm - 4:30pm
San Antonio Lower Floor

3:30pm

"Launch" into Learning!

Are you looking for a way to engage difficult students? In this session we will show you examples of successful PBL projects utilized at Title 1 high schools. Additional focus will be given to the attributes of a successful PBL, experience. We will address any questions and concerns in an open forum after our presentation. Come ready to "Launch" into Project-Based Learning with experienced PBL practitioners.


Speaker/Facilitator

Thursday January 20, 2011 3:30pm - 5:00pm
San Marcos Lower Floor

3:30pm

Engaging Students in Physics Using Astonishing Demonstrations and Activities

This session contains samples of the following items with their strategy to motivate students and also the benefits to the teaching physics principles : 1- Physics Toys 2- Simple Physics Demos 3- Construction of Interesting Physics Projects 4- Physics Competitions a) T-Shirt Design b) Spaghetti Bridge c) Water rocket d ) Mousetrap cars e) Short Film Competitions 5- Exhibitions and shows to the public by the students


Speaker/Facilitator
LS

Levent Sakar

Levent Sakar | www.leventsakar.info | STEM Activity Coordinator | Physics Department Chair | Harmony Public Schools | www.harmonytx.org | (713) 343-3333 ext:245


Thursday January 20, 2011 3:30pm - 5:00pm
Concho Main Floor

3:30pm

Give Them a Reason to Learn!

Recent research provides evidence that some students achieve twice the pre-post gains in scores on science content knowledge questions when they complete engineering design activities rather than learning by the structured inquiry approach used in most science classrooms. This effect is especially dramatic for lower performing African-American males. The objectives of this workshop are to: 1) Clarify the distinction between guided inquiry and design-based activities; 2) Examine design-based activities that are aligned to the TEKS; 3) Choose TEKS and CCRS that are most appropriate for design-based instruction in secondary science classes; 4) Provide resources to find classroom-tested activities;. and 5) Experience and evaluate a hands-on, design-based activity using Pico Crickets as the rapid prototyping system. The target audience for this workshop includes MS teachers, HS teachers, and administrators. The applicable content areas are: MS science-data collection, organization, & analysis; MS math-statistics & data analysis; IPC; and Biology.


Speaker/Facilitator

Thursday January 20, 2011 3:30pm - 5:00pm
Nueces Main Floor

3:30pm

K-12 STEM Outreach Forums: Creating Connections and Collaborations to Excite Kids about STEM

Calling all organizations, schools and individuals involved in science, technology, engineering and math education and outreach in Texas! Network and learn about the resources available to assist you in your efforts from the Texas Girls Collaborative Project (TxGCP) and the T-STEM Network. Connect with university programs, K-12 schools, Girl Scouts, Central Texas Discover Engineering, students, volunteers and more! Hear about how to get engineers in your classroom and about free hands-on STEM activities available for formal or informal K-12 education. And share what you and/or your organization are doing to excite kids about STEM fields and connect to those who can help you get the resources you need. Share, network, connect, collaborate....all in a fun and interactive high-energy session!


Speaker/Facilitator
avatar for Tricia Berry

Tricia Berry

Director, Texas Girls Collaborative Project (TxGCP)& Director, Women in Engineering Program (WEP) at The University of T, The University of Texas at Austin
tsberry@mail.utexas.edu | | Named one of the 100 Women Leaders in STEM by STEMconnector at the 2012 US News STEM Solutions Summit, Tricia Berry leads efforts to connect those working to advance gender equity in STEM fields. As Texas Girls Collaborative Project Director, she leads the dissemination of STEM resources across Texas in coordination with the National Girls Collaborative Project. She concurrently serves as Women in Engineering... Read More →


Thursday January 20, 2011 3:30pm - 5:00pm
Trinity - front Lower Floor

3:30pm

Priming YOUR Pipeline: WeDo Robotics in Your Feeder Elementary Schools

Most students make up their mind whether or not they like math and science by the 4th or 5th grade. Thus we cannot wait until high school to try to gain their interest in STEM subjects and career paths - we must engage them at a young age. In this session you will not only get a hands-on experience learning how to use the LEGO Education WeDo Robotics kit, but you will also learn how to work with elementary schools to use and engage students with robotics to prime your student pipeline.


Speaker/Facilitator
avatar for Stephanie Brierty

Stephanie Brierty

Stephanie is a T-STEM Education Specialist with the Transformation 2013 T-STEM Center out of Austin. In her former life, Stephanie worked for National Instruments as the K-12 Program Manager where she engineering, managed, and promoted new K-12 products. She has a BS in Materials Science and Engineering from Georgia Tech.


Thursday January 20, 2011 3:30pm - 5:00pm
Sabine Lower Floor

3:30pm

Providing engaged learning in a STEM environment: The Blog

In this engaging, hands-on workshop, we'll examine one of the most useful, clever, and basic tools that should be used with computers in education…the blog! This program promises to promote effective and innovative practices while emphasizing the relevance in content-rich curriculum. Attendees will leave with their own blog that’s ready for the classroom! In addition, they’ll learn about other downloads and applications created just for educators while making their own web tool! These tips will take a second to master, but will be useful forever. This session will teach educators how to build a classroom tool that can adapt to different student abilities, interests and attributes…all the while integrating rich STEM curriculum in a format that is engaging for our kids.


Speaker/Facilitator
avatar for Robin Mounts

Robin Mounts

Robin specializes in technology education: distance learning, student broadcast-media, and integrating STEM curriculum. Currently, she’s STEM Coordinator for Sinton ISD. She also teaches media, is the district SMART Board trainer, and facilitates a technology rich facility called The Discovery Center.


Thursday January 20, 2011 3:30pm - 5:00pm
Guadalupe Main Floor

3:30pm

Using the GLOBE Program to Support PBL

The Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) program is a worldwide hands-on science and education program. GLOBE's vision promotes and supports students, teachers and scientists to collaborate on inquiry-based investigations of the environment and the Earth system working in close partnership with NASA, NOAA and NSF Earth System Science Projects (ESSP's) in study and research about the dynamics of Earth's environment. This session will highlight how GLOBE can be used to support PBL.


Speaker/Facilitator

Thursday January 20, 2011 3:30pm - 5:00pm
Wedgewood Main Floor

3:30pm

Enhancing Your STEM Toolbox: Rigor, Questioning, and Instructional Strategies

This session will focus on Effective Questioning Strategies and Indirect Instructional Strategies as tools to support PBL and facilitate rigor in the STEM classroom. Participants will be introduced to instructional techniques which engage students and promote interactive, student-centered learning.



Thursday January 20, 2011 3:30pm - 5:00pm
Brazos Main Floor

3:30pm

TAME Trailer

The TAME Trailblazer has been fitted with a variety of engineering and science exhibits and travels across the state. Alliance volunteers and/or the TAME central office arrange for the sponsored Trailblazer events which take place at schools or as part of a community or corporate event. Where possible, parents are invited to tour as well. Volunteers are stationed throughout the trailers to provide oral explanations and demonstrations of the exhibits. The Trailblazer continues to be an important outreach program and is made possible by generous support from Boeing, ConocoPhillips, Dow, Halliburton, Houston Museum of Natural Science, Marathon Oil Company, Shell Oil Company, United Space Alliance.


Speaker/Facilitator

Thursday January 20, 2011 3:30pm - 5:00pm
~ Parking Lot

4:30pm

"Playing" with Statistics through Sports

This presentation will be showing how statistics can be used in the classroom. It will be about a project we do here in Fruitvale. Fruitvale has a basketball tournament for our boys and girls each year. My students go to the games and take basketball stats. We take shots, shots made, free throws made or missed, turnovers and other information the students can then take back to the classroom and break down the numbers. We take percentages, averages, mean, mode, and range. I have film footage of students working in groups and also will present a powerpoint explaining this idea.


Speaker/Facilitator

Thursday January 20, 2011 4:30pm - 5:00pm
San Antonio Lower Floor

4:30pm

Making the most of the time: an effective mini-mester

A seamless transition to college utilizing “spare days” for dual credit students.  In this session you will discover how to include credit courses for college preparedness across the high school grade levels.  This is a unique approach to scheduling with students commenting: “This is the most valuable time use for us in moving toward college.”


Speaker/Facilitator

Thursday January 20, 2011 4:30pm - 5:00pm
Pecos Main Floor
 
Friday, January 21
 

7:30am

Breakfast
Friday January 21, 2011 7:30am - 8:30am
~Ballroom Foyer Main Floor

8:30am

Collaborative Career Cluster STEM Camps

Learn how to set up collaborative career cluster STEM Camps. Utilize your partnerships to engage students in learning about science and math concepts and the different Achieve career clusters.


Speaker/Facilitator

Friday January 21, 2011 8:30am - 9:00am
Concho Main Floor

8:30am

DISTCO 2010 (Digital Storytelling Contest)

Digital storytelling is a process of creating a short movie that combines a script or an original story with various multimedia components, such as images, video, music and a narration, often an author’s own voice. Digital storytelling is an educational technology tool that utilizes skills students are expected to have in the 21st century. Information literacy, visual literacy, being creative and taking risks, and using the latest technology to communicate effectively can all be achieved when students actively participate in the creation process of digital storytelling. Given the benefits of using Digital Storytelling in the classroom, a new and exciting contest has been developed. DISTCO 2010 is part of a series of “Digital Storytelling Contests” hosted by Harmony School of Arts and Technology (HSART) and sponsored by Cosmos Foundation. The contest is open to all K-12 students and teachers at both national and international level. The DISTCO 2010 asks students and teachers to submit their digital stories in a certain time frame and manner for the contest. The competition will be held solely online through this website. The project has certain benefits for both students and teacher. It is a way of exposing and challenging the students in a competition where they can show their certain skills in multimedia, technology, researching, writing and creativity.


Speaker/Facilitator

Friday January 21, 2011 8:30am - 9:00am
San Antonio Lower Floor

8:30am

Taking the first Step: Introducing Nanotechnology in High Schools

Dr. Dominick Fazarro is an Associate Professor-Industrial Technology Program in the Department of Human Resource Development and Technology at the University of Texas at Tyler.  Dr. Fazarro is one of America’s emerging authorities and thought leaders in both researching and addressing nanotechnology issues and their genisis in the workforce in the United States. Dr. Fazarro is an strong advocate in developing nanotechnology education in post-secondary schools to begin the surge in developing the 21st century workforce.  He has partnered with several insitutions, like Rice University, Texas State University, and San Jacinto College to create the foundation to implement nano-safety curriculum at the Texas.  Dr. Fazarro presented and published several papers on developing the nanoworkforce.  He partnered with Rice University and Texas State University to submit an OSHA grant which was funded $236,000 in September 2010 to facilitate online training in nanotechnology safety.  Dr. Fazarro is a member of the Texas Advisory Committeee for Nanotechnology Safety and Education.


Speaker/Facilitator

Friday January 21, 2011 8:30am - 9:00am
Sabine Lower Floor

8:30am

Expedition Earth and Beyond

This session will engage participants in working with astronaut photography images of Earth and will ultimately provide teachers with ready-to-use activities that will enhance their classroom instruction. Activities will be inquiry-based and allow the hook of space exploration to inspire students to be more engaged in their learning. Teachers will learn about the Expedition Earth and Beyond Program which provides classrooms with hands-on activities, the opportunity to participate in distance learning events connecting classrooms with scientists, and the opportunity to have students conduct authentic research using images acquired by astronauts on the International Space Station. Participants will leave this session with standards-aligned,ready-to-use activities easily incorporated into their classrooms and the knowledge of how they can have their classrooms benefit from other opportunities. Participants will increase their own personal knowledge of activities being conducted on/from the International Space Station, increase their background knowledge of Earth and other planetary bodies in our solar system, and learn new strategies of how to incorporate inquiry-based activities and techniques in the classroom.


Speaker/Facilitator

Friday January 21, 2011 8:30am - 10:00am
Pecos Main Floor

8:30am

How “Sweet” it is!

Come see an engaging Project Based Learning example that has been successfully implemented at a Title 1 High School. We will discuss the development and implementation of the PBL from the perspective of teachers new to the STEM initiative. Special attention will be given to roadblocks and challenges that CAN be overcome to make a successful PBL activity whether you are an expert or novice teacher!


Speaker/Facilitator

Friday January 21, 2011 8:30am - 10:00am
Nueces Main Floor

8:30am

So Why Should I Care What Marzano Said?

This very interactive workshop will center on instructional strategies that make a STEM classroom the center for highly engaged students who are able to learn, retain and retrieve knowledge for high achievement. Investigations into Robert Marzano's research provide a foundation for instructional decisions about resources, projects, and methods of delivery for content. Networking and collaborative strategies will be utilized.


Speaker/Facilitator
avatar for Teresa K Talley

Teresa K Talley

Assistant Director for Professional Support, Accelerate Learning
I work with the SRT-STEM Center at UT-Medical Branch in Galveston. As the Co-Director for Education Outreach I have the opportunity to work with STEM Academies and STEM Designated Campuses in the implementation of 21st Century Skills for the development of our future workforce. I am passionate about classroom pedagogy and the instructional strategies that bridge the gap in student knowledge and teacher effectiveness. I works as a mentor and... Read More →


Friday January 21, 2011 8:30am - 10:00am
Guadalupe Main Floor

8:30am

STEM Preparation Strategies for Careers in Medicine - Eliminating Health Disparities

Disparities in health care delivery increasingly affect the health (and security) of this nation. Emphasis on primary care in the new health reform bill as well as the rising cost of a medical education essentially guarantee that persons of lower income families (disproportionately already underrepresented in STEM disciplines) cannot afford to go to medical school. Yet, the demographics of America are changing and many of today's medical students may not have the exposure or understanding of patients or colleagues of other cultures. This workshop outlines the road map to a medical education, starting from math/science competence in high school, a summer medical immersion program, and strategies to increase enrollment of underrepresented minority students in medical schools nationwide. Scholarship strategies will also be explored. A proven immersion program, called S2M2: Science, Service, Medicine, & Mentoring will be described and can be distributed to high schools nationwide. A hands-on demonstration of laparoscopic surgery skills will also be provided.


Speaker/Facilitator
CM

Cynthia Macri

My workshop will show you the path to Medicine and a fulfilling career using a patient simulation and laparoscopic surgery skills trainer! My life's goal is to ensure that all students are given opportunity and exposure to STEM careers and to eliminate health disparities in health care delivery. Together, we can change the face of Medicine, and improve survival rates for all.


Friday January 21, 2011 8:30am - 10:00am
Brazos Main Floor

8:30am

UTeachEngineering: Everything Old is New in Engineering Design

Come learn about the UTeachEngineering programs for teachers: the Engineering Summer Institute for Teachers and the new summer Masters in Science and Engineering Education at UT Austin. Participants in this workshop will work through a sample hands-on engineering lab and discuss the unique pedagogical requirements of engineering education. STEM educators teaching the 4th year science Engineering Design and Problem Solving course, or those who are simply looking to expose their students to engineering concepts and methodologies, won't want to miss this interactive session. Everything old is new in engineering design!


Speaker/Facilitator

Friday January 21, 2011 8:30am - 10:00am
Wedgewood Main Floor

9:30am

Research and Practice: Scaling to Broaden the Impact to Industry and Education

As the demand for Micro-technology technicians continues to increase, there is a critical need for a standardized/readily available Microsystems curriculum to facilitate rapid dissemination of these highly skilled individuals. In an effort to lay the foundation for Microsystems education, the National Science Foundation (NSF) funded the creation of the Southwest Center for Microsystems Education (SCME) under its Advanced Technological Education program in 2004 and 2009 (DUE Grant Nos. 0402651, 0902411). Since the SCME has developed dozens of Learning Modules and several hands-on kits, it has become apparent that there is a need to improve the promulgation of these materials to educational organizations on a national scale in order to impact a larger segment of the student population. Utilizing lessons from the “Research, Practice and Transformation through Synergy Project” (DUE No 0903224) and “lean” manufacturing methodologies, the SCME is beginning to experience broader impact from their educational offerings that are now being duplicated by other projects/centers (scale). The presentation describes how SCME has actively engaged industry to improve their instructional materials design and delivery which will reduce the time to market, and increase penetration.


Speaker/Facilitator

Friday January 21, 2011 9:30am - 10:00am
Sabine Lower Floor

9:30am

Robotics education at Harmony Charter Schools

Harmony schools lead the way in FLL Robotics and FIRST Robotics. We are proud to say many Harmony students have competed in local, national and international competitions with their robotics projects. 84 FLL teams from countries around the world are invited to participate in FIRST LEGO League World Festival and FIRST Championship in St.Louis, Missouri. One of our teams won the Champion's Award 1st Place in Southwest FLL Championship. This team will represent Texas in World Championship as one of 84 teams around the world. The Harmony Science Academy-El Paso Robotics Team represented the United States in the European Open Robotics Competition in Denmark, 2009. HSA-El Paso is one of only six teams representing the United States in this International event. Team coach and student members will present how they worked in order to accomplish this great success.


Speaker/Facilitator

Friday January 21, 2011 9:30am - 10:00am
Concho Main Floor

9:30am

“Viva Computing: Science and Technology for Elementary School Children”

Viva Computing is an after-school program conducted at the Lawrence Boys and Girls Club (LBGC) and other locations since 2008, in Lawrence, MA, a city with a large Latino population. The goal of Viva Computing is to engage young Latina girls in technological and computational inquiry, specific uses of computers, their tools and applications. We try to acquaint the girls with technology by engaging them in hands-on day-to-day activities focusing on computer science, engineering, and technology. Our activities explore mathematics, technology, science and problem solving. We expose them to various devices and methods that handle information. We challenge the girls to “invent” applications, to experiment, and to have fun working individually and in groups. We use strategies that have been proven to be successful with a variety of learners. These include (1) focusing on specific themes; (2) mixing art and technology; (3) encouraging storytelling and exploration. The sessions are held after the academic day. To our surprise the girls are very eager and excited to join, stay on and participate. Following the success of “Viva Computing” at the LBGC, our program now includes girls and boys.


Speaker/Facilitator

Friday January 21, 2011 9:30am - 10:00am
San Antonio Lower Floor

10:00am

Break - Snacktime
Friday January 21, 2011 10:00am - 10:30am
~Ballroom Foyer Main Floor

10:30am

Collaborating and Communicating to Engage More Girls in STEM

Increased collaborations and enhanced communications are critical to change the demographics of engineers and scientists - to increase the diversity of those pursing science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields. The Austin Children’s Museum, Central Texas Discover Engineering, Girlstart, the Texas Girls Collaborative Project, The University of Texas at Austin Women in Engineering Program, UTeachEngineering, and The University of Texas at Tyler Ingenuity Center share examples and methods of collaboration and communication enabling all to reach more precollege girls and excite them about STEM careers. Explore collaboration and communication opportunities for all organizations across Texas to engage more girls in STEM.


Speaker/Facilitator
avatar for Tricia Berry

Tricia Berry

Director, Texas Girls Collaborative Project (TxGCP)& Director, Women in Engineering Program (WEP) at The University of T, The University of Texas at Austin
tsberry@mail.utexas.edu | | Named one of the 100 Women Leaders in STEM by STEMconnector at the 2012 US News STEM Solutions Summit, Tricia Berry leads efforts to connect those working to advance gender equity in STEM fields. As Texas Girls Collaborative Project Director, she leads the dissemination of STEM resources across Texas in coordination with the National Girls Collaborative Project. She concurrently serves as Women in Engineering... Read More →
avatar for Tamara Hudgins

Tamara Hudgins

Girlstart’s mission is to empower and equip girls in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). We accomplish our mission by developing innovative STEM programs for girls, teachers, and families, thereby empowering girls to achieve in STEM education, and feed the national STEM workforce.
avatar for Kristian Trampus

Kristian Trampus

Kristian Trampus is a former oceanographer and chemistry teacher who currently serves as STEM Director of the Ingenuity Center and as Research Faculty at the University of Texas at Tyler.  Additionally, she serves as: Southeastern Liaison for AAUW to the National Girls Collaborative Project, Leadership Board – Texas Girls Collaborative Project, Certified GLOBE Teacher, TRC Project director,  EYH Coordinator (UT-Tyler and... Read More →


Friday January 21, 2011 10:30am - 11:00am
Brazos Main Floor

10:30am

Online Resources and Homework Systems

In Harmony Public Schools, using online Homework systems, such as Mastering Physics, and Mastering Biology, helped us increase our AP scores significantly. On the other hand, another semi-online, semi-in class system "Accelerated Math" is used to increase one on one and small group interactions in 6-12 Math and High School Science classes. No technology tool is sufficient by itself to increase student achievement. The success or failure of using an online (technology) system depends on the following: 1- Adequate training of teachers with clear expectations 2- Training teachers on how to increase student buy-in by changing student attitude towards class-work and homework 3- Creating a cooperative learning environment in class 4- Using feedback mechanism that is in the online system to reach students who need extra help. In this presentation, some of the technology tools that were used by Harmony teachers will be shared along with best practices and lessons learned. Ali Erenkol Science Department Chair Harmony Public Schools


Speaker/Facilitator
AE

Ali Erkan Erenkol

AP Physics teacher and Science Department Chair at Harmony Public Schools


Friday January 21, 2011 10:30am - 11:00am
Pecos Main Floor

10:30am

Assessment of aligment between TEKS & CCRS

The Surveys of Enacted Curriculum (SEC) is a research-based data tool that allows teachers, administrators, and policy makers to examine the extent of alignment between the enacted curriculum (what teachers teach), the intended curriculum (what the standards require), and the assessed curriculum (what the state tests).  The Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills ( TEKS) were examined in conjunction with the THECB College & Career Readiness Standards.


Speaker/Facilitator
avatar for Kristian Trampus

Kristian Trampus

Kristian Trampus is a former oceanographer and chemistry teacher who currently serves as STEM Director of the Ingenuity Center and as Research Faculty at the University of Texas at Tyler.  Additionally, she serves as: Southeastern Liaison for AAUW to the National Girls Collaborative Project, Leadership Board – Texas Girls Collaborative Project, Certified GLOBE Teacher, TRC Project director,  EYH Coordinator (UT-Tyler and... Read More →


Friday January 21, 2011 10:30am - 12:00pm
Wedgewood Main Floor

10:30am

Caching in on Literature: Technology, World Geography, and Literature Working in Harmony

Geo-caching is an outdoor activity in which the participants use a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver and other navigational techniques to hide and seek "caches." The contents of the caches can be easily related to current classroom instruction in a variety of disciplines and can provide students with a new and exciting learning experience. The use of GPS units can also be a highly effective tool when instruction is centered on Project Based Learning. Geo-caching, waypoint marking, and other GPS activities lend themselves naturally to problem-solving and other higher-order thinking skills. A.T.E.M.S. students work in small groups to create and locate geo-caches which contain literary elements of the short story contained in their required coursework readings. Students engage in locating the waypoint, analyzing the contents of the geo-cache, and communicating the results of their discoveries in original short stories. The students work in groups to find the waypoints, locate the geo-caches, and collect the element of the short story which is inside. When they are finished with the activity, they have ten elements of a short story. The students then collaborate and write a short story using the elements of the short story which they have collected.


Speaker/Facilitator
JY

Jennifer Yates

Presenters include Mary Margaret Smith, Nathan Monroe and Jennifer Yates.


Friday January 21, 2011 10:30am - 12:00pm
Guadalupe Main Floor

10:30am

Managing the Project-Based Learning Classroom

Managing the Project-Based Learning Classroom (PBL) will help educators develop a classroom environment suitable for Project-Based Learning. Topics include classroom rules and structures that help facilitation of PBL in the classroom. Helpful tools will be provided for team development, for improving team performance, and for assessing both individual and team performance in a PBL classroom. Finally, the benefits of student teamwork will be discussed; and procedures for overcoming the travails of implementing group learning also will be addressed.


Speaker/Facilitator
LS

Linda Stearns

Linda Stearns graduated with a B.S. in Geology and a M.S. in Mathamatics Education both from Texas A&M University. She taught secondary mathematics and science for 20 years before becoming the Associate Director for the Aggie-STEM center in 2008.


Friday January 21, 2011 10:30am - 12:00pm
San Antonio Lower Floor

10:30am

Robotics for All

Investigate the power of the LEGO MINDSTORMS® Education (LME) NXT-G software as you explore how to combine a graphical-based programming language with LEGO Technic elements. Transition from the common palette to the complete palette to have a better understanding of loops, switches, and sensor blocks.


Speaker/Facilitator

Friday January 21, 2011 10:30am - 12:00pm
Nueces Main Floor

10:30am

Scaffolding Project Based Learning Implementation

Project Based Learning is a complex instructional framework that requires administrators to assess the instructional readiness of their staff. In this workshop, participants will explore critical components of PBL and explore strategies for implementation that address the needs of their teachers.




Friday January 21, 2011 10:30am - 12:00pm
Sabine Lower Floor

10:30am

Sky is Sky – Ground is Ground

The session provides an engaging and relevant way to teach and answer the question, "Why do I need to know inequalities?". Using a real-world scenario, this session demonstrates how to scaffolded the concept of inequalities using STEM tools. Participants will utilize technological tools(e.g., flip-cams, TI-Nspire Calculators, and free internet resources)and strategies to present the concept in a diffentiated way.


Speaker/Facilitator
GP

Gustavo Perez

STEM Specialist, Region One ESC
Region One STEM Education Specialist.


Friday January 21, 2011 10:30am - 12:00pm
Concho Main Floor

11:30am

Mentoring Early Career STEM Teachers: The TRC BTIM Project

Through the Beginning Teacher Induction and Mentoring Project coordinated by the TRC, over 700 early career science and math teachers have been mentored using research based strategies and protocols. This presentation will highlight some of the most successful strategies to-date for mentoring new STEM teachers and discuss how schools or districts can get involved in this program.


Speaker/Facilitator
avatar for Carol Fletcher, Ph.D.

Carol Fletcher, Ph.D.

Associate Director, The University of Texas at Austin
carol.fletcher@austin.utexas.edu | The best part about my job with the TRC is getting to do great things for the hardest working people I know - TRC Teachers! Our teachers put so much time and effort into growing themselves professionally that is is wonderful to be able to, in some small way, let them know how much they are appreciated by the TRC.
avatar for Teresa K Talley

Teresa K Talley

Assistant Director for Professional Support, Accelerate Learning
I work with the SRT-STEM Center at UT-Medical Branch in Galveston. As the Co-Director for Education Outreach I have the opportunity to work with STEM Academies and STEM Designated Campuses in the implementation of 21st Century Skills for the development of our future workforce. I am passionate about classroom pedagogy and the instructional strategies that bridge the gap in student knowledge and teacher effectiveness. I works as a mentor and... Read More →
avatar for Amy Werst

Amy Werst

Compliance and Accountability Coordinator, Texas Regional Collaboratives - HQ
amy.werst@austin.utexas.edu


Friday January 21, 2011 11:30am - 12:00pm
Pecos Main Floor

11:30am

The Texas STEM Equity Pipeline: A 5-Step Process to Expand Options for Women and Girls in STEM Fields

The national STEM Equity Pipeline project has chosen four Texas community colleges that will use the National Alliance for Partnerships in Equity (NAPE) Five-Step Program Improvement Process to increase female participation and completion in STEM fields. This session will give an overview of the NAPE 5-Step Process and tell about the programs these 4 community colleges are working to improve.


Speaker/Facilitator
SW

Susie Wheeler

Susie Wheeler is the Texas facilitator for the STEM Equity Pipeline. She has been a professional educator for over 30 years. Most recently, she has been the project manager for a Perkins State Leadership grant titled Gender Equity in CTE, working with Texas community colleges to help them improve non-traditional student participation and completion by using the NAPEEF 5-Step Process. Wheeler works at Amarillo College in the Assessment... Read More →


Friday January 21, 2011 11:30am - 12:00pm
Brazos Main Floor

12:00pm

Christianne Corbett - Special Guest Luncheon Speaker

Christianne Corbett is a senior researcher at the American Association of University Women (AAUW) and co-author of Why So Few? Women in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (2010). Before coming to AAUW, she worked as a legislative fellow in the office of Rep. Carolyn Maloney and as a mechanical design engineer in the aerospace industry. She holds a master's degree in cultural anthropology from the University of Colorado, Boulder, and bachelor's degrees in aerospace engineering and government from the University of Notre Dame. As a Peace Corps volunteer in Ghana from 1992 to 1994, she taught math and science to secondary school students.


Speaker/Facilitator

Friday January 21, 2011 12:00pm - 1:30pm
~ Ballroom A Main Floor - Renaissance Arboretum, Austin, Texas

1:30pm

Enabling 21st Century Science Education

Join us for this workshop and learn how to prepare your students for the future: 21st Century science education using 21st Century science methods and tools. Deliver authentic 21st Century science experiences by combining standards-based content and relevant professional development with innovations in modern, electronic measurement.


Speaker/Facilitator

Friday January 21, 2011 1:30pm - 2:00pm
San Antonio Lower Floor

1:30pm

Is Grading a Problem?

Presentation will give an opportunity to learn methods for effective grading with technology. The CPS software allows you to create and deliver course- relevant questions and standards. Students use their response pads to respond to the questions and standards you deliver. The receiver unit records students’ performance results. Then CPS compiles and reports student performance results. Objectives of Presentation: One of problem why students cannot learn in long term is that when students don't learn their mistake when they turn in their homework. My goals of the presentation is that grading can be done easily with a technological device. With CPS you can • Instantly receive and grade homework, reviews, tests, and standards measurements. • Generate detailed reports about how each student performs in class. • Record all CPS and non-CPS-generated grades and automatically calculate averages. • How to use CPS with Examview


Speaker/Facilitator

Friday January 21, 2011 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Guadalupe Main Floor

1:30pm

Science Starters

Use technology as you spiral through the science TEKS to improve student performance! Science Starters are daily teacher-directed presentations for use in all science classrooms grades 3-12. As teachers spiral through the tested TEKS, students receive the constant review and remediation necessary for success. This process, already proven in Texas classrooms, will allow you to vertically and horizontally align science instruction, emphasize the 5E model of instruction, and assist students with instructional gaps and language barriers. Science Starters will ensure that all science students receive clear, consistent, and effective instruction.


Speaker/Facilitator
avatar for Kathy Reeves

Kathy Reeves

President, Scientific Minds, LLC
Scientific Minds publishes online resources (accompanied by professional development) for science education. This award-winning process includes strategies for the diverse learner and can result in significant gains in student performance.


Friday January 21, 2011 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Concho Main Floor

1:30pm

The STEM Academy (K-12 Program) improving STEM literacy for all students

Learn how The STEM Academy – an IRS approved 501 (c) (3) nonprofit curriculum for K-12 was designed to improve student achievement or student growth, close achievement gaps, decrease dropout rates, increase high school graduation rates, or improve teacher and principal effectiveness. Curriculum is rigorous, innovative and comprehensive and was collaboratively developed by K-12 teachers, university consultants, industry partners and engineering and bio-medical professionals. The STEM Academy prepares students to be competent, capable citizens in a technology-dependent society through comprehensive student assessments including traditional tests, project based learning presentations and portfolios. This STEM centric program is focused on standard based foundations, gender awareness, socio-economic concerns and general learner needs to engage as many learners as possible. Program develops engineering pipeline by featuring a main line education approach providing STEM education for all students.


Speaker/Facilitator

Friday January 21, 2011 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Sabine Lower Floor

1:30pm

The TI Navigator System

The TI Navigator System provides a method of wireless communication between students and teacher via calculators. This system allows teachers to easily integrate technology in the classroom. This device allows for teachers to track student progress, check knowledge of content, and provide instant feedback to students. This system has helped to keep my students engaged and keep track of their understanding in my class. The TI Navigator system has become an integral part of my classroom and my instruction. The students look forward to utilizing the system everyday! I believe this system would a great tool for in every math classroom.


Speaker/Facilitator

Friday January 21, 2011 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Brazos Main Floor

1:30pm

UT Dallas Roundtable
Friday January 21, 2011 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Wedgewood Main Floor

1:30pm

Five Pre-lab & Lab activities in Newtonian Mechanics

Present five pre-lab activities utilizing white boards to prepare students for the subsequent lab activities in Newtonian mechanics. Projectile motion, determination of friction & its coefficient, conservation of energy, determination of the spring constant, and conservation of momentum in two dimensions. Participants will work in small groups to prepare white boards to share with the whole group for each topic. Participants will receive copies of the pre-lab and lab activity that are covered. The lab activities presented utilize the GMLAD which will on exhibit at the conference. Key to success of a lab activity is the student’s prerequisite skills. This workshop focuses on 5 pre-lab white board activities with the corresponding lab activities in Newtonian mechanics utilizing the GMLAD. The activities will cover projectile motion; kinematics, Newton’s 2nd Law, Determination of Friction and its Coefficient, Conservation of Energy, Determination of the Spring Constant, and Conservation of Momentum in 2 Dimensions.


Speaker/Facilitator
JM

James Mangold

James Mangold attended University of Texas where in received a BS in Geology with a minor in mathematics. He became certified in Texas as a secondary science and mathematics instructor in 1985. In 2001 he completed his Master of Ed in Physics – Curriculum and Instruction at Texas A&M. James, besides teaching, has involved himself in many academic extra curricular activities; such as Science UIL, the Physics Olympics and the Chemical Olympics... Read More →


Friday January 21, 2011 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Pecos Main Floor

1:30pm

Project Pow Wow

Need some feedback on a project you are planning? Have questions about planning a PBL Unit? This session will be devoted to addressing your needs as they pertain to implementing PBL. Content specialists will be on hand to address specific content concerns. Participants are encouraged to bring current/past project plans and ideas to share.


Speaker/Facilitator

Friday January 21, 2011 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Nueces Main Floor

3:00pm

Break - Snacktime
Friday January 21, 2011 3:00pm - 3:30pm
~Ballroom Foyer Main Floor